One of God s noblemen - Internet Archive

One of God s Noblemen (Classic Reprint): R L Sheldon.



One of God's Noblemen (Classic Reprint)

Another Greek poet, Hesiod, whom flourished around 700 B.C.E., is often referred to as the “father of didactic poetry”. Like Homer, not much is know about him. He was probably from mainland Greece, and most likely a rhapsodist, a reciter of poems. Hesiod himself attributes his work to the inspiration of Muses, and we know of at least one invitation that he received for his participation in a poetic contest (much like those participated in by the great tragedians and comedians of Classical Greece; notably, Sophocles, Aeschylus, and Euripides; and Aristophanes.)  Two of his epics are extant in their entirety: the  Theogony  and  Works and Days .

For more than 2,000 years, Egypt was one of the richest and most civilized lands in the ancient world. Much of what we know about this great civilization has been learned from its art and architecture. In particular, the ruins of tombs and temples have provided a valuable record of Egyptian life.

The Egyptians were extremely religious, and their belief in life after death was an important part of their culture. They believed that, in order for the spirit to live on, the dead person's body had to be preserved, or mummified, and buried along with supplies of food and drink, tools and utensils, valued possessions—all the things the person had needed or enjoyed on earth. The higher the person's station in life, the more extensive the preparations for the afterlife. Kings and other wealthy persons had elaborate tombs built. Sculptures and wall paintings in the tombs were also created for use in the next life.

The gods, too, needed proper care. Their temples were built as great palaces, with stables, orchards and farmlands, and staffs of attendants. Daily rituals and seasonal festivals were pictured on the temple walls. Rulers prided themselves on what they had done to improve the shrines of the gods.

Egyptian history is usually divided according to the 30 dynasties (series of rulers of the same family) listed by an early historian. The first dynastic period began about 3000 B.C. with the legendary ruler Menes (also called Narmer), who united Egypt under one government and founded the capital city of Memphis.

A carved slate slab, or palette, made about 3000, shows Narmer, his raised arm holding a club, about to crush the head of his enemy. In the Narmer palette the human form is portrayed in a way that became standard in Egyptian art. The head and legs are shown from the side, while the eye and shoulders are shown from the front.

The first great period of Egyptian civilization, called the Old Kingdom, began during the rule of King Zoser. The advances of the period were due mainly to Imhotep, the king's first minister. He was a skilled architect, statesman, and scholar. He was probably the architect of the famous Step Pyramid at Saqqara. The Step Pyramid was the first stone building in history and the first of the many pyramids to appear during the next 1,000 years.

Another Greek poet, Hesiod, whom flourished around 700 B.C.E., is often referred to as the “father of didactic poetry”. Like Homer, not much is know about him. He was probably from mainland Greece, and most likely a rhapsodist, a reciter of poems. Hesiod himself attributes his work to the inspiration of Muses, and we know of at least one invitation that he received for his participation in a poetic contest (much like those participated in by the great tragedians and comedians of Classical Greece; notably, Sophocles, Aeschylus, and Euripides; and Aristophanes.)  Two of his epics are extant in their entirety: the  Theogony  and  Works and Days .



41kG8PvqyHL