MDHHS - Child Support - Michigan

Michigan Child Support Calculator - micase.state.mi.us



Michigan child support formula manual

On this Friday after a wonderful Thanksgiving, we are exploring a less than wonderful topic. Over the past month I have been publishing articles about divorce is Michigan. Recently, those posts have been related to divorce with children.

Today, we’re reviewing child support. We will be looking into what it is, who pays it and how the court will decide how much is paid.

You do not have to have been married to your child’s other parent in order to file and receive child support. While this subject has fallen under our divorce in Michigan series, you do not have to be going through a divorce to be ordered to pay child support.

Child support is a parent’s court-ordered payment to help with the costs of raising a child. Child support normally includes a base amount, plus amounts for health care expenses and child care expenses. Child support can be ordered as part of a paternity or custody case (if the parents were never married), as part of a divorce case, or as a support case.”

Both parents are required to support the child financially. Whether or not your rights have been terminated as a parent, you are still required to pay child support.

The information provided on this blog is free for your reference and is not intended as legal counsel. The situation for each person, couple and family is different. If you have any specific questions about your situation, please feel free to contact me. You can contact me in the comment section below, by using our convenient contact form or by giving my office a call.

If you've already obtained a child support order , and the non-custodial parent isn't making payments, or if the person ordered to pay is behind in making those payments (called arrearages ), there are a number of tools the court can use.

In Michigan, child support enforcement services are provided by the Michigan Department of Human Services, Friend of the Court .

The Friend of the Court and/or the Office of Child Support can petition the court to get a parent to pay their child support including:

The Friend of the Court can refer the case to the county prosecutor , who may charge the person who owes support with the crime of felony non-support. Felony non-support charges are generally issued after other child support collection methods have not been successful. Custodial parents may also ask the county prosecutor for felony non-support prosecution.

After a certain amount of arrearages build up, the court can schedule a contempt hearing . If the court decides the payer could pay some or all of the amount owed, the payer can be held in contempt. Penalties for contempt may include any of the enforcement methods listed here (like suspending a driver’s license), plus fines, jail time, and other penalties

If a parent is having problems making payments, he or she should contact the court immediately. The parent can always seek to modify their existing support order. This will require going back to court and explaining to the judge why you can’t make your payments. Only a judge can change the amount you owe under a support order. Additionally, if either parent receives public assistance, the Friend of the Court automatically reviews the child support order amount every 36 months.

On this Friday after a wonderful Thanksgiving, we are exploring a less than wonderful topic. Over the past month I have been publishing articles about divorce is Michigan. Recently, those posts have been related to divorce with children.

Today, we’re reviewing child support. We will be looking into what it is, who pays it and how the court will decide how much is paid.

You do not have to have been married to your child’s other parent in order to file and receive child support. While this subject has fallen under our divorce in Michigan series, you do not have to be going through a divorce to be ordered to pay child support.

Child support is a parent’s court-ordered payment to help with the costs of raising a child. Child support normally includes a base amount, plus amounts for health care expenses and child care expenses. Child support can be ordered as part of a paternity or custody case (if the parents were never married), as part of a divorce case, or as a support case.”

Both parents are required to support the child financially. Whether or not your rights have been terminated as a parent, you are still required to pay child support.

The information provided on this blog is free for your reference and is not intended as legal counsel. The situation for each person, couple and family is different. If you have any specific questions about your situation, please feel free to contact me. You can contact me in the comment section below, by using our convenient contact form or by giving my office a call.

If you've already obtained a child support order , and the non-custodial parent isn't making payments, or if the person ordered to pay is behind in making those payments (called arrearages ), there are a number of tools the court can use.

In Michigan, child support enforcement services are provided by the Michigan Department of Human Services, Friend of the Court .

The Friend of the Court and/or the Office of Child Support can petition the court to get a parent to pay their child support including:

The Friend of the Court can refer the case to the county prosecutor , who may charge the person who owes support with the crime of felony non-support. Felony non-support charges are generally issued after other child support collection methods have not been successful. Custodial parents may also ask the county prosecutor for felony non-support prosecution.

After a certain amount of arrearages build up, the court can schedule a contempt hearing . If the court decides the payer could pay some or all of the amount owed, the payer can be held in contempt. Penalties for contempt may include any of the enforcement methods listed here (like suspending a driver’s license), plus fines, jail time, and other penalties

If a parent is having problems making payments, he or she should contact the court immediately. The parent can always seek to modify their existing support order. This will require going back to court and explaining to the judge why you can’t make your payments. Only a judge can change the amount you owe under a support order. Additionally, if either parent receives public assistance, the Friend of the Court automatically reviews the child support order amount every 36 months.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) - Information on Child Support Services for customers and employers.

Welcome to the new Michigan State Disbursement Unit (MiSDU) Website. MiSDU is part of the Child Support System for the State of Michigan . Use this site for ...

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) - Information on Child Support forms, publications, and order forms.

The Michigan child department of health and human services is designed to give the best and most reasonable solution to child support . It is aimed at helping out ...

Child support is a parent’s court-ordered payment to help with the costs of raising a child . Child support normally includes a base amount, plus amounts for health ...

The child support formula is reviewed and changed periodically and its figures updated for economic changes. When these changes occur, the bureau issues a new ...

On this Friday after a wonderful Thanksgiving, we are exploring a less than wonderful topic. Over the past month I have been publishing articles about divorce is Michigan. Recently, those posts have been related to divorce with children.

Today, we’re reviewing child support. We will be looking into what it is, who pays it and how the court will decide how much is paid.

You do not have to have been married to your child’s other parent in order to file and receive child support. While this subject has fallen under our divorce in Michigan series, you do not have to be going through a divorce to be ordered to pay child support.

Child support is a parent’s court-ordered payment to help with the costs of raising a child. Child support normally includes a base amount, plus amounts for health care expenses and child care expenses. Child support can be ordered as part of a paternity or custody case (if the parents were never married), as part of a divorce case, or as a support case.”

Both parents are required to support the child financially. Whether or not your rights have been terminated as a parent, you are still required to pay child support.

The information provided on this blog is free for your reference and is not intended as legal counsel. The situation for each person, couple and family is different. If you have any specific questions about your situation, please feel free to contact me. You can contact me in the comment section below, by using our convenient contact form or by giving my office a call.