Dionysius I: Warlord of Sicily by Brian Caven

Dionysius I : war-lord of Sicily / | University of Toronto.



Dionysius I Warlord of Sicily

Hail Caesar is written by the hugely talented Rick Priestley who is something of an expert in Ancients gaming. Partly because of his studying in... View full product details

Hail Caesar is written by the hugely talented Rick Priestley who is something of an expert in Ancients gaming. Partly because of his studying in... View full product details

Collection contains the Hail Caesar rulebook and both and army lists plus the free Roman Centurion miniature So aside from Rick Priestly's firsthand experience of... View full product details

Gaius Julius Caesar was surely the most famous Roman of all time – conqueror, statesman and founder of an empire that would shape the destiny... View full product details

In this, our first expansion for Hail Caesar, Rick presents no less than 63 army lists for the Biblical and Classical periods along with points... View full product details

Our latest publication is the second army list book for Hail Caesar 84pp softback book The following armys are included: Palmyran Middle Imperial Roman Sassanid... View full product details

Hail Caesar is written by the hugely talented Rick Priestley who is something of an expert in Ancients gaming. Partly because of his studying in... View full product details

Hail Caesar is written by the hugely talented Rick Priestley who is something of an expert in Ancients gaming. Partly because of his studying in... View full product details

Collection contains the Hail Caesar rulebook and both and army lists plus the free Roman Centurion miniature So aside from Rick Priestly's firsthand experience of... View full product details

Gaius Julius Caesar was surely the most famous Roman of all time – conqueror, statesman and founder of an empire that would shape the destiny... View full product details

In this, our first expansion for Hail Caesar, Rick presents no less than 63 army lists for the Biblical and Classical periods along with points... View full product details

Our latest publication is the second army list book for Hail Caesar 84pp softback book The following armys are included: Palmyran Middle Imperial Roman Sassanid... View full product details

Himilco next led the army raised by Carthage, 50,000 men along with 400 triremes and 600 transports [ 7 ] to Sicily in 397 BC. By the time the Carthaginians had reached Syracuse, the war fleet had shrunk to 250 ships, while 2,000 transports had been employed to carry supplies to the army. The number of soldiers is not known, as some garrisoned the Carthaginian possessions, while Carthaginians had been reinforced by Sicels, Sikans and Elymians after arriving in Sicily.

Dionysius had an army of 30,000 foot and 3,000 horsemen at Catana along with 180 Quinqueremes. After the defeat of his navy and the desertion of his allies his forces had shrunk to 80 ships, but he managed to hire some mercenaries, and the population of Syracuse also supplied a number of soldiers to augment his forces. 30 triremes later joined him from Greece.

The Libyans supplied both heavy and light infantry and formed the most disciplined units of the army. The heavy infantry fought in close formation, armed with long spears and round shields, wearing helmets and linen cuirasses. The light Libyan infantry carried javelins and a small shield, same as Iberian light infantry. Campanian, Sardinian and Gallic infantry fought in their native gear, [ 8 ] but often were equipped by Carthage. Sicels and other Sicilians were equipped like Greek Hoplites .

The Punic navy was built around the trireme, Carthaginian citizens usually served as crew alongside recruits from Libya and other Carthaginian domains. Carthaginian forces had captured a number of Quinqueremes from the Greeks at Catana, it is unknown if Carthaginians were constructing this type of ships themselves at this point. 40 Quinqueremes were present at Syracuse. Although the initial Punic armada at Syracuse contained 250 warships and 3,000 transports, it is unknown how many were permanently stationed there for the siege.

The mainstay of the Greek army was the Hoplite , drawn mainly from the citizens by Dionysius had a large number of mercenaries from Italy and Greece as well. Sicels and other native Sicilians also served in the army as hoplites and also supplied peltasts , and a number of Campanians, probably equipped like Samnite or Etruscan warriors, were present as well. The Phalanx was the standard fighting formation of the army. Dionysius also had the option of using old men and women as peltasts if needed. The cavalry was recruited from wealthier citizens and mercenaries.

The Syracuse navy was built around the Quinquereme, an invention attributed to Dionysius, and the trireme. Dionysius also transport ships available, but the number is unknown. Citizen rowers manned the fleet.



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