The Journey | The Great Journeys of New Zealand

The Journey | The Great Journeys of New Zealand



The Journey: The Great Sword of Truth

Journey to the Center of the Earth ( French : Voyage au centre de la Terre , also translated under the titles A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and A Journey to the Interior of the Earth ) is an 1864 science fiction novel by Jules Verne . The story involves German professor Otto Lidenbrock who believes there are volcanic tubes going toward the centre of the Earth. He, his nephew Axel, and their guide Hans descend into the Icelandic volcano Snæfellsjökull , encountering many adventures, including prehistoric animals and natural hazards, before eventually coming to the surface again in southern Italy, at the Stromboli volcano.

The genre of subterranean fiction already existed long before Verne. However, the present book considerably added to its popularity and influenced later such writings. For example, Edgar Rice Burroughs explicitly acknowledged Verne's influence on his own Pellucidar series.

In Snefflls [ sic ] Iokulis kraterem kem delibat umbra Skartaris Iulii intra kalendas deskende, audas uiator, te [ sic ] terrestre kentrum attinges. Kod feki. Arne Saknussemm.

In Sneffels Jokulis craterem, quem delibat umbra Scartaris, Julii intra kalendas descende, audax viator, et terrestre centrum attinges; quod feci. Arne Saknussemm

Descend, bold traveller, into the crater of the jökull of Snæfell , which the shadow of Scartaris touches (lit: tastes) before the Kalends of July, and you will attain the centre of the earth. I did it. Arne Saknussemm

Professor Lidenbrock is a man of astonishing impatience, and departs for Iceland immediately, taking his reluctant nephew with him. Axel, who, in comparison, is cowardly and anti-adventurous, repeatedly tries to reason with him, explaining his fears of descending into a volcano and putting forward various scientific theories as to why the journey is impossible, but Professor Lidenbrock repeatedly keeps himself blinded against Axel's point of view. After a rapid journey via Kiel and Copenhagen , they arrive in Reykjavík , where the two procure the services of Hans Bjelke (a Danish-speaking Icelander eiderdown hunter) as their guide, and travel overland to the base of the volcano.

NOTE : You are welcome to link to this article, but do not copy or repost it. If you would like a PDF copy to use in your class or work, please contact me . This article is from The Hero’s Journey: A Guide to Literature and Life (2007). For an updated version of the article, see our publication The Hero’s Journey: The Path of Transformation .

Most of us were introduced to the Heroic Journey through mythology. Mythological heroes take great journeys: to slay Medusa, to kill the Minotaur, to find the Golden Fleece. But the Hero’s Journey isn’t just a pattern from myth. It’s the pattern of life, growth and experience—for all of us. We see it reflected everywhere, from a television comedy show to the great works of literature to the experiences in our own lives.

Why study The Hero’s Journey? Why learn a pattern that dates from before recorded history? The answer is simple: we should study it because it’s the pattern of human experience, of our experience. We live it now, and we will live it for the rest of our lives.

In a sense, every challenge or change we face in life is a journey. Every love found, every love lost, every birth and every death carries the potential of transformation to a new level of understanding. Every move to a new school, job, or city opens the chance to stop being what we were and to start being what we can become. Every situation which confronts us with something new or which forces us to re-evaluate our thinking, behavior or perspective presents us with possibilities for insight and growth.

The journey is a process of self-discovery and self-integration, of maintaining balance and harmony in our lives. As with any process of growth and change, a journey can be confusing and painful, but it brings opportunities to develop confidence, perspective and a new way of being in our world.

Understanding the Journey pattern can help us understand the literature we read, the movies we see, and the experiences which shape our life. By recognizing the Journey’s stages and how they function, we will develop a sense of the flow of our own experience and be better able to make decisions and solve problems. More importantly, we will begin to recognize our own points of passage and respect the significance they have for us.

Based on the book by Jules Verne, we designed a fantastic adventure-based obstacle course. The story centers on an expedition led by the students down into the Earth’s dark and threatening core.

The object of the activity is to successfully negotiate each obstacle, avoid being tagged by the underground creatures (students and/or parents), and find the center of the earth. This journey is cooperative in nature, as students help each other through the obstacles.

“Journey to the Center of the Earth” was a project of our Student Council and helps promote school-wide fitness, with Geography and English Literature skills incorporated into the course. The student representatives help to design and work the obstacle course. Using equipment available at most schools, we set up six obstacles in the gym.

Beware of the “Lava People,” who are underground creatures roaming beneath the volcano and don’t like to be disturbed. The Earth’s core or center is guarded by these creatures (students or parents in disguise and wearing pinnies). If one tags you, you must go back to the beginning of the course and start over. However, if you see it coming, you may protect yourself by squatting down and putting both hands on the ground. In addition, the creatures may not tag you if you are in the middle of an obstacle. So there is nothing to fear while you are performing the obstacle. Here are the six obstacles:

1.) Glistening Cavern of Quartz Crystals: The crystals are cones and whiffle balls that are lined up. The students must move in and out of the quartz crystals in a slalom-like course. If they miss a cone or knock down a whiffle ball, they must go back to the beginning of the course. At the end of the cavern, they will come to the next obstacle.

2.) Crossing the Subterranean Sea: This is a large mass of subterranean water that is occupied by monsters of the deep, eyeless fish, and blind piranhas. Students need to negotiate the raft (scooter boards) by using the rope line to pull themselves to the other side. If they fall off or are unable to make it across, they must start over.

Journey to the Center of the Earth ( French : Voyage au centre de la Terre , also translated under the titles A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and A Journey to the Interior of the Earth ) is an 1864 science fiction novel by Jules Verne . The story involves German professor Otto Lidenbrock who believes there are volcanic tubes going toward the centre of the Earth. He, his nephew Axel, and their guide Hans descend into the Icelandic volcano Snæfellsjökull , encountering many adventures, including prehistoric animals and natural hazards, before eventually coming to the surface again in southern Italy, at the Stromboli volcano.

The genre of subterranean fiction already existed long before Verne. However, the present book considerably added to its popularity and influenced later such writings. For example, Edgar Rice Burroughs explicitly acknowledged Verne's influence on his own Pellucidar series.

In Snefflls [ sic ] Iokulis kraterem kem delibat umbra Skartaris Iulii intra kalendas deskende, audas uiator, te [ sic ] terrestre kentrum attinges. Kod feki. Arne Saknussemm.

In Sneffels Jokulis craterem, quem delibat umbra Scartaris, Julii intra kalendas descende, audax viator, et terrestre centrum attinges; quod feci. Arne Saknussemm

Descend, bold traveller, into the crater of the jökull of Snæfell , which the shadow of Scartaris touches (lit: tastes) before the Kalends of July, and you will attain the centre of the earth. I did it. Arne Saknussemm

Professor Lidenbrock is a man of astonishing impatience, and departs for Iceland immediately, taking his reluctant nephew with him. Axel, who, in comparison, is cowardly and anti-adventurous, repeatedly tries to reason with him, explaining his fears of descending into a volcano and putting forward various scientific theories as to why the journey is impossible, but Professor Lidenbrock repeatedly keeps himself blinded against Axel's point of view. After a rapid journey via Kiel and Copenhagen , they arrive in Reykjavík , where the two procure the services of Hans Bjelke (a Danish-speaking Icelander eiderdown hunter) as their guide, and travel overland to the base of the volcano.

Journey to the Center of the Earth ( French : Voyage au centre de la Terre , also translated under the titles A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and A Journey to the Interior of the Earth ) is an 1864 science fiction novel by Jules Verne . The story involves German professor Otto Lidenbrock who believes there are volcanic tubes going toward the centre of the Earth. He, his nephew Axel, and their guide Hans descend into the Icelandic volcano Snæfellsjökull , encountering many adventures, including prehistoric animals and natural hazards, before eventually coming to the surface again in southern Italy, at the Stromboli volcano.

The genre of subterranean fiction already existed long before Verne. However, the present book considerably added to its popularity and influenced later such writings. For example, Edgar Rice Burroughs explicitly acknowledged Verne's influence on his own Pellucidar series.

In Snefflls [ sic ] Iokulis kraterem kem delibat umbra Skartaris Iulii intra kalendas deskende, audas uiator, te [ sic ] terrestre kentrum attinges. Kod feki. Arne Saknussemm.

In Sneffels Jokulis craterem, quem delibat umbra Scartaris, Julii intra kalendas descende, audax viator, et terrestre centrum attinges; quod feci. Arne Saknussemm

Descend, bold traveller, into the crater of the jökull of Snæfell , which the shadow of Scartaris touches (lit: tastes) before the Kalends of July, and you will attain the centre of the earth. I did it. Arne Saknussemm

Professor Lidenbrock is a man of astonishing impatience, and departs for Iceland immediately, taking his reluctant nephew with him. Axel, who, in comparison, is cowardly and anti-adventurous, repeatedly tries to reason with him, explaining his fears of descending into a volcano and putting forward various scientific theories as to why the journey is impossible, but Professor Lidenbrock repeatedly keeps himself blinded against Axel's point of view. After a rapid journey via Kiel and Copenhagen , they arrive in Reykjavík , where the two procure the services of Hans Bjelke (a Danish-speaking Icelander eiderdown hunter) as their guide, and travel overland to the base of the volcano.

NOTE : You are welcome to link to this article, but do not copy or repost it. If you would like a PDF copy to use in your class or work, please contact me . This article is from The Hero’s Journey: A Guide to Literature and Life (2007). For an updated version of the article, see our publication The Hero’s Journey: The Path of Transformation .

Most of us were introduced to the Heroic Journey through mythology. Mythological heroes take great journeys: to slay Medusa, to kill the Minotaur, to find the Golden Fleece. But the Hero’s Journey isn’t just a pattern from myth. It’s the pattern of life, growth and experience—for all of us. We see it reflected everywhere, from a television comedy show to the great works of literature to the experiences in our own lives.

Why study The Hero’s Journey? Why learn a pattern that dates from before recorded history? The answer is simple: we should study it because it’s the pattern of human experience, of our experience. We live it now, and we will live it for the rest of our lives.

In a sense, every challenge or change we face in life is a journey. Every love found, every love lost, every birth and every death carries the potential of transformation to a new level of understanding. Every move to a new school, job, or city opens the chance to stop being what we were and to start being what we can become. Every situation which confronts us with something new or which forces us to re-evaluate our thinking, behavior or perspective presents us with possibilities for insight and growth.

The journey is a process of self-discovery and self-integration, of maintaining balance and harmony in our lives. As with any process of growth and change, a journey can be confusing and painful, but it brings opportunities to develop confidence, perspective and a new way of being in our world.

Understanding the Journey pattern can help us understand the literature we read, the movies we see, and the experiences which shape our life. By recognizing the Journey’s stages and how they function, we will develop a sense of the flow of our own experience and be better able to make decisions and solve problems. More importantly, we will begin to recognize our own points of passage and respect the significance they have for us.

Journey to the Center of the Earth ( French : Voyage au centre de la Terre , also translated under the titles A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and A Journey to the Interior of the Earth ) is an 1864 science fiction novel by Jules Verne . The story involves German professor Otto Lidenbrock who believes there are volcanic tubes going toward the centre of the Earth. He, his nephew Axel, and their guide Hans descend into the Icelandic volcano Snæfellsjökull , encountering many adventures, including prehistoric animals and natural hazards, before eventually coming to the surface again in southern Italy, at the Stromboli volcano.

The genre of subterranean fiction already existed long before Verne. However, the present book considerably added to its popularity and influenced later such writings. For example, Edgar Rice Burroughs explicitly acknowledged Verne's influence on his own Pellucidar series.

In Snefflls [ sic ] Iokulis kraterem kem delibat umbra Skartaris Iulii intra kalendas deskende, audas uiator, te [ sic ] terrestre kentrum attinges. Kod feki. Arne Saknussemm.

In Sneffels Jokulis craterem, quem delibat umbra Scartaris, Julii intra kalendas descende, audax viator, et terrestre centrum attinges; quod feci. Arne Saknussemm

Descend, bold traveller, into the crater of the jökull of Snæfell , which the shadow of Scartaris touches (lit: tastes) before the Kalends of July, and you will attain the centre of the earth. I did it. Arne Saknussemm

Professor Lidenbrock is a man of astonishing impatience, and departs for Iceland immediately, taking his reluctant nephew with him. Axel, who, in comparison, is cowardly and anti-adventurous, repeatedly tries to reason with him, explaining his fears of descending into a volcano and putting forward various scientific theories as to why the journey is impossible, but Professor Lidenbrock repeatedly keeps himself blinded against Axel's point of view. After a rapid journey via Kiel and Copenhagen , they arrive in Reykjavík , where the two procure the services of Hans Bjelke (a Danish-speaking Icelander eiderdown hunter) as their guide, and travel overland to the base of the volcano.

NOTE : You are welcome to link to this article, but do not copy or repost it. If you would like a PDF copy to use in your class or work, please contact me . This article is from The Hero’s Journey: A Guide to Literature and Life (2007). For an updated version of the article, see our publication The Hero’s Journey: The Path of Transformation .

Most of us were introduced to the Heroic Journey through mythology. Mythological heroes take great journeys: to slay Medusa, to kill the Minotaur, to find the Golden Fleece. But the Hero’s Journey isn’t just a pattern from myth. It’s the pattern of life, growth and experience—for all of us. We see it reflected everywhere, from a television comedy show to the great works of literature to the experiences in our own lives.

Why study The Hero’s Journey? Why learn a pattern that dates from before recorded history? The answer is simple: we should study it because it’s the pattern of human experience, of our experience. We live it now, and we will live it for the rest of our lives.

In a sense, every challenge or change we face in life is a journey. Every love found, every love lost, every birth and every death carries the potential of transformation to a new level of understanding. Every move to a new school, job, or city opens the chance to stop being what we were and to start being what we can become. Every situation which confronts us with something new or which forces us to re-evaluate our thinking, behavior or perspective presents us with possibilities for insight and growth.

The journey is a process of self-discovery and self-integration, of maintaining balance and harmony in our lives. As with any process of growth and change, a journey can be confusing and painful, but it brings opportunities to develop confidence, perspective and a new way of being in our world.

Understanding the Journey pattern can help us understand the literature we read, the movies we see, and the experiences which shape our life. By recognizing the Journey’s stages and how they function, we will develop a sense of the flow of our own experience and be better able to make decisions and solve problems. More importantly, we will begin to recognize our own points of passage and respect the significance they have for us.

Based on the book by Jules Verne, we designed a fantastic adventure-based obstacle course. The story centers on an expedition led by the students down into the Earth’s dark and threatening core.

The object of the activity is to successfully negotiate each obstacle, avoid being tagged by the underground creatures (students and/or parents), and find the center of the earth. This journey is cooperative in nature, as students help each other through the obstacles.

“Journey to the Center of the Earth” was a project of our Student Council and helps promote school-wide fitness, with Geography and English Literature skills incorporated into the course. The student representatives help to design and work the obstacle course. Using equipment available at most schools, we set up six obstacles in the gym.

Beware of the “Lava People,” who are underground creatures roaming beneath the volcano and don’t like to be disturbed. The Earth’s core or center is guarded by these creatures (students or parents in disguise and wearing pinnies). If one tags you, you must go back to the beginning of the course and start over. However, if you see it coming, you may protect yourself by squatting down and putting both hands on the ground. In addition, the creatures may not tag you if you are in the middle of an obstacle. So there is nothing to fear while you are performing the obstacle. Here are the six obstacles:

1.) Glistening Cavern of Quartz Crystals: The crystals are cones and whiffle balls that are lined up. The students must move in and out of the quartz crystals in a slalom-like course. If they miss a cone or knock down a whiffle ball, they must go back to the beginning of the course. At the end of the cavern, they will come to the next obstacle.

2.) Crossing the Subterranean Sea: This is a large mass of subterranean water that is occupied by monsters of the deep, eyeless fish, and blind piranhas. Students need to negotiate the raft (scooter boards) by using the rope line to pull themselves to the other side. If they fall off or are unable to make it across, they must start over.

Approaching dusk, a Vietnamese family of 12 from Pennsylvania scrambles to move from their two minivans in Parking Lot 1 to the America’s Niagara Falls before nightfall.

“One-two-three-four ...” he counts heads; two boys in matching Gap tees, three infants in strollers. His in-laws stick together as he orchestrates a family portrait with a stranger. Then onward to America’s oldest state park.

“It was a long drive,” he said, exasperated. “The elders, they are new to the country right now, so [I’m] just trying to make them spend some quality time.”

Niagara Falls State Park , western New York’s showcase for 8 million annual visitors, was an obvious destination for the Chhantyals. It’s less than a day’s drive to the U.S.-Canadian border, complete with a free display of illuminated falls and fireworks, and an adventurous ‘Maid of the Mist’ boat ride, where families soak up the mist beside Horseshoe Falls’ 2,509 thunderous tons of force .

Like 79 percent of American household vacations , the trailblazing dozen took the open road to reach their destination — an afternoon of cramped quarters and one failed engine along the Appalachian-backdrop interstate, set to the reverberating vocals of Katy Perry and Bruno Mars.

But like explorers that came centuries before them, the story of how they got there is ultimately one that will remain integral to the adventure, and a lasting memory.



41K6SGQ0FSL