The Book of Wheat, An Economic History and Practical Manual

The Book of Wheat - Forgotten Books



The Book of Wheat: An Economic History and Practical Manual of the Wheat Industry 1919

As Canadians gather this weekend to celebrate Thanksgiving, there is a growing movement afoot to demonize one of the staples of the Canadian harvest: wheat.

An increasing number of books, blogs and celebrities have fingered wheat as the cause of a variety of conditions, from obesity to heart disease, as well as a host of digestive problems.

One of the most talked-about health books right now is Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight and Find Your Path Back to Health , a New York Times bestseller by U.S. cardiologist Dr. William Davis.

Earlier this year, reality-TV star Kim Kardashian made headlines when she announced that she had cut wheat from her diet.

"I think people are willing to do anything to alleviate their digestive concerns and try anything to resolve their weight issues," says Susan Watson, a registered dietitian in Winnipeg, about the growing anti-wheat movement.

"From a general health standpoint, unless you're celiac or have a diagnosed wheat intolerance, cutting any food group or any food product completely out of your diet is not generally recommended," says Watson.

As Canadians gather this weekend to celebrate Thanksgiving, there is a growing movement afoot to demonize one of the staples of the Canadian harvest: wheat.

An increasing number of books, blogs and celebrities have fingered wheat as the cause of a variety of conditions, from obesity to heart disease, as well as a host of digestive problems.

One of the most talked-about health books right now is Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight and Find Your Path Back to Health , a New York Times bestseller by U.S. cardiologist Dr. William Davis.

Earlier this year, reality-TV star Kim Kardashian made headlines when she announced that she had cut wheat from her diet.

"I think people are willing to do anything to alleviate their digestive concerns and try anything to resolve their weight issues," says Susan Watson, a registered dietitian in Winnipeg, about the growing anti-wheat movement.

"From a general health standpoint, unless you're celiac or have a diagnosed wheat intolerance, cutting any food group or any food product completely out of your diet is not generally recommended," says Watson.

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