US invasion of Grenada - Wikipedia

The US Invasion of Grenada: - Global Policy Forum



the invasion of grenada

"An edited extract of the forthcoming account of U.S. Army operations on Grenada: The Rucksack War: U.S. Army Operational Logistics in Grenada."

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President Ronald Reagan, citing the threat posed to American nationals on the Caribbean nation of Grenada by that nation’s Marxist regime, orders the Marines to invade and secure their safety. There were nearly 1,000 Americans in Grenada at the time, many of them students at the island’s medical school. In little more than a week, Grenada’s government was overthrown.

A number of Americans were skeptical of Reagan’s defense of the invasion, noting that it took place just days after a disastrous explosion in a U.S. military installation in Lebanon killed over 240 U.S. troops, calling into question the use of military force to achieve U.S. goals. Nevertheless, the Reagan administration claimed a great victory, calling it the first “rollback” of communist influence since the beginning of the Cold War.

Pablo Picasso, one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, is born in Malaga, Spain. Picasso’s father was a professor of drawing, and he bred his son for a career in academic art. Picasso had his first exhibit at age 13 and later quit art school so...

On this day in 1774, the First Continental Congress sends a respectful petition to King George III to inform his majesty that if it had not been for the acts of oppression forced upon the colonies by the British Parliament, the American people would be standing behind British rule. Despite the...

On October 25, 1910, white race car driver Barney Oldfield beats prizefighter Jack Johnson, the first African-American heavyweight champion of the world, in two five-mile car races in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn. Oldfield and Johnson had a history: Oldfield’s friend, the white heavyweight champ James J. Jeffries, had quit boxing in 1908...

On this day in 1861, signaling an important shift in the history of naval warfare, the keel of the Union ironclad Monitor is laid at Greenpoint, New York. Union Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles appointed an Ironclad Board when he heard rumors that the Confederates were trying to build an...

On 7 September 2004, after being hurricane-free for 49 years, the island was directly hit by Hurricane Ivan , which damaged or destroyed 90% of the island's homes. On 14 July 2005 Hurricane Emily struck the northern part of the island, causing an estimated USD $110 million ( EC$ 297 million) worth of damage.

The origin of the name "Grenada" is obscure, but it is likely that Spanish sailors renamed the island for the city of Granada . [7] By the beginning of the 18th century, the name "Grenada", or "la Grenade" in French , was in common use. [8]

On his third voyage to the region in 1498, Christopher Columbus sighted Grenada and named it "La Concepción" in honour of the Virgin Mary . It is said that he may have actually named it "Assumpción", but it is uncertain, as he is said to have sighted what are now Grenada and Tobago from a distance and named them both at the same time. However, history has accepted that it was Tobago he named "Assumpción" and Grenada he named "La Concepción". [7]

In 1499, the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci travelled through the region with the Spanish explorer Alonso de Ojeda and mapmaker Juan de la Cosa . Vespucci is reported to have renamed the island "Mayo", which is how it appeared on maps for around the next 20 years.

In the 1520s the Spanish named the islands to the north of Mayo as Los Granadillos (Little Granadas), presumably after the mainland Spanish town. Shortly after this, Mayo disappeared from Spanish maps and an island called "Granada" took its place. Although it was deemed the property of the King of Spain , there are no records to suggest the Spanish ever landed or settled on the island. [9]

After French settlement and colonisation in 1650, the French named their colony "La Grenade". On 10 February 1763 the island of La Grenade was ceded to the British under the Treaty of Paris . The British renamed it "Grenada", one of many place name anglicisations they carried out on the island during this time. [10]

"An edited extract of the forthcoming account of U.S. Army operations on Grenada: The Rucksack War: U.S. Army Operational Logistics in Grenada."

Some users may encounter difficulties opening these files from the server. If the entire document will not open, select "Save" instead of "Open". Once the file has been saved to your hard drive it should open without any problem.

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

President Ronald Reagan, citing the threat posed to American nationals on the Caribbean nation of Grenada by that nation’s Marxist regime, orders the Marines to invade and secure their safety. There were nearly 1,000 Americans in Grenada at the time, many of them students at the island’s medical school. In little more than a week, Grenada’s government was overthrown.

A number of Americans were skeptical of Reagan’s defense of the invasion, noting that it took place just days after a disastrous explosion in a U.S. military installation in Lebanon killed over 240 U.S. troops, calling into question the use of military force to achieve U.S. goals. Nevertheless, the Reagan administration claimed a great victory, calling it the first “rollback” of communist influence since the beginning of the Cold War.

Pablo Picasso, one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, is born in Malaga, Spain. Picasso’s father was a professor of drawing, and he bred his son for a career in academic art. Picasso had his first exhibit at age 13 and later quit art school so...

On this day in 1774, the First Continental Congress sends a respectful petition to King George III to inform his majesty that if it had not been for the acts of oppression forced upon the colonies by the British Parliament, the American people would be standing behind British rule. Despite the...

On October 25, 1910, white race car driver Barney Oldfield beats prizefighter Jack Johnson, the first African-American heavyweight champion of the world, in two five-mile car races in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn. Oldfield and Johnson had a history: Oldfield’s friend, the white heavyweight champ James J. Jeffries, had quit boxing in 1908...

On this day in 1861, signaling an important shift in the history of naval warfare, the keel of the Union ironclad Monitor is laid at Greenpoint, New York. Union Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles appointed an Ironclad Board when he heard rumors that the Confederates were trying to build an...

"An edited extract of the forthcoming account of U.S. Army operations on Grenada: The Rucksack War: U.S. Army Operational Logistics in Grenada."

Some users may encounter difficulties opening these files from the server. If the entire document will not open, select "Save" instead of "Open". Once the file has been saved to your hard drive it should open without any problem.

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

"An edited extract of the forthcoming account of U.S. Army operations on Grenada: The Rucksack War: U.S. Army Operational Logistics in Grenada."

Some users may encounter difficulties opening these files from the server. If the entire document will not open, select "Save" instead of "Open". Once the file has been saved to your hard drive it should open without any problem.

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

President Ronald Reagan, citing the threat posed to American nationals on the Caribbean nation of Grenada by that nation’s Marxist regime, orders the Marines to invade and secure their safety. There were nearly 1,000 Americans in Grenada at the time, many of them students at the island’s medical school. In little more than a week, Grenada’s government was overthrown.

A number of Americans were skeptical of Reagan’s defense of the invasion, noting that it took place just days after a disastrous explosion in a U.S. military installation in Lebanon killed over 240 U.S. troops, calling into question the use of military force to achieve U.S. goals. Nevertheless, the Reagan administration claimed a great victory, calling it the first “rollback” of communist influence since the beginning of the Cold War.

Pablo Picasso, one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, is born in Malaga, Spain. Picasso’s father was a professor of drawing, and he bred his son for a career in academic art. Picasso had his first exhibit at age 13 and later quit art school so...

On this day in 1774, the First Continental Congress sends a respectful petition to King George III to inform his majesty that if it had not been for the acts of oppression forced upon the colonies by the British Parliament, the American people would be standing behind British rule. Despite the...

On October 25, 1910, white race car driver Barney Oldfield beats prizefighter Jack Johnson, the first African-American heavyweight champion of the world, in two five-mile car races in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn. Oldfield and Johnson had a history: Oldfield’s friend, the white heavyweight champ James J. Jeffries, had quit boxing in 1908...

On this day in 1861, signaling an important shift in the history of naval warfare, the keel of the Union ironclad Monitor is laid at Greenpoint, New York. Union Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles appointed an Ironclad Board when he heard rumors that the Confederates were trying to build an...

On 7 September 2004, after being hurricane-free for 49 years, the island was directly hit by Hurricane Ivan , which damaged or destroyed 90% of the island's homes. On 14 July 2005 Hurricane Emily struck the northern part of the island, causing an estimated USD $110 million ( EC$ 297 million) worth of damage.

The origin of the name "Grenada" is obscure, but it is likely that Spanish sailors renamed the island for the city of Granada . [7] By the beginning of the 18th century, the name "Grenada", or "la Grenade" in French , was in common use. [8]

On his third voyage to the region in 1498, Christopher Columbus sighted Grenada and named it "La Concepción" in honour of the Virgin Mary . It is said that he may have actually named it "Assumpción", but it is uncertain, as he is said to have sighted what are now Grenada and Tobago from a distance and named them both at the same time. However, history has accepted that it was Tobago he named "Assumpción" and Grenada he named "La Concepción". [7]

In 1499, the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci travelled through the region with the Spanish explorer Alonso de Ojeda and mapmaker Juan de la Cosa . Vespucci is reported to have renamed the island "Mayo", which is how it appeared on maps for around the next 20 years.

In the 1520s the Spanish named the islands to the north of Mayo as Los Granadillos (Little Granadas), presumably after the mainland Spanish town. Shortly after this, Mayo disappeared from Spanish maps and an island called "Granada" took its place. Although it was deemed the property of the King of Spain , there are no records to suggest the Spanish ever landed or settled on the island. [9]

After French settlement and colonisation in 1650, the French named their colony "La Grenade". On 10 February 1763 the island of La Grenade was ceded to the British under the Treaty of Paris . The British renamed it "Grenada", one of many place name anglicisations they carried out on the island during this time. [10]

(Photo: via Shutterstock) It has been exactly 30 years since US forces invaded Grenada, ending that Caribbean island nation's four-year socialist experiment. The island nation no bigger than Martha's Vineyard, with a population that could barely fill the Rose Bowl, was defeated with relatively few American casualties. President Ronald Reagan's decision to occupy the country and replace the government with one more to his liking proved to be quite popular in the United States, with polls indicating that 63 percent of the public supported the invasion.

On this anniversary, it would be worth looking back at the Grenadian revolution, the U.S. invasion, its aftermath and the important precedent it set for "regime change" through U.S. military intervention.

One of the tiny island nations that grew out of the British colonies in the eastern Caribbean, Grenada - like its neighbors - was populated by descendants of black African slaves. The original inhabitants, the Carib Indians, were wiped out during the early stages of colonialism. Receiving independence in 1974, the island was ruled initially by the despotic and eccentric Prime Minister Sir Eric Gairy, whose murderous secret police - known as the Mongoose Squad - and his passion for flying saucers, the occult and extra-terrestrial communication had brought him notoriety throughout the hemisphere.

The literacy rate, already at a respectable 85 percent, grew to about 98 percent, comparable to or higher than most industrialized countries. A free health care and secondary education system were established, the number of secondary schools tripled, and scores of Grenadians received scholarships for studies abroad. There were ambitious programs in the development of the fishing industry, handicrafts, housing, tourism, the expansion of roads and transport systems and the upgrading of public utilities.

What excited many in the American progressive community was the government's openness to decentralization and appropriate technology, which allowed small-scale American entrepreneurs access to development planning alongside those preferring a more traditional, centralized, capital-intensive model. It was an accessible revolution, close by and carried out by English-speaking people influenced more by Black Power and New Left politics than by Soviet-style communism.

Reagan immediately implied that the Cubans were behind the coup and the killings. In reality, Cuban President Fidel Castro had condemned the coup and declared an official day of mourning for the late prime minister. Strongly worded cables from Havana underscored the Cuban government's concern, threatening a cessation of Cuban assistance and a declaration that Cuban forces on the island would fire only in self-defense.

"An edited extract of the forthcoming account of U.S. Army operations on Grenada: The Rucksack War: U.S. Army Operational Logistics in Grenada."

Some users may encounter difficulties opening these files from the server. If the entire document will not open, select "Save" instead of "Open". Once the file has been saved to your hard drive it should open without any problem.



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