The Invasion (2007) - Rotten Tomatoes

The Invasion Movie Review & Film Summary (2007. - Roger.



the invasion review

Sixteen months after the launch of Total War: Warhammer , Creative Assembly have developed and released a second entry that’s both conventional stand-alone sequel, and a significant expansion towards a planned trilogy of combined titles. Total War: Warhammer 2 will, ultimately, hook up with the first game and all of its factions for a ‘Mortal Empires’ campaign that will span (a version of) the Old and New Worlds. For now though it is a stand-alone follow-up, with four new factions and plenty of applied lessons from the past year-and-some spent on the series.

Players who closely followed the first Total Warhammer and its steady flow of paid and free DLC will know that Creative Assembly leaned heavily into the idea of faction diversity. Some of the mechanics that were technically unique at launch, weaker stuff like the Empire’s political offices, were eclipsed by later additions like Bretonnia’s peasant economy or Norsca’s monster hunt quests. That confident approach to merging lore and flavour with the moving parts of a strategy game has continued in Total War: Warhammer 2 , which pushes the factional distinctions even further with its four races.

The vast majority of my time has been spent in command of Malekith’s torture-happy Dark Elves, so I’ll be using them as the bulk of my examples. That’s no slight on the other three (Lizardmen, Skaven, High Elves), who from what I’ve experienced have just as many specialties of their own. Total War: Warhammer 2’s main campaign is much longer than Warhammer’s , so I made the choice to primarily relive my teenaged tabletop years with the Dark Elves. Except without Games Workshop charging me a tenner for every new bolt thrower.

Dark Elves are sadistic types, led by a guy who once had a reasonable claim to the High Elf throne but has long since torpedoed his eligibility by embracing murder, slavery, goth rock, and a thoroughly weird relationship with his mum. When a Dark Elf army chooses to take captives after a battle those prisoners show up as a resource and start to generate income, instead of just vanishing to some invisible slave mill.

Having captives show up as a tangible number (that’s just for Dark Elves, the other factions have their own special mechanics), affects several of the strategic choices a player will be making. Certain building chains and technology choices tie directly into the slave economy. Public order will also be affected if cities get absurdly packed with captives, and, unless this was a review build oversight, the Dark Elves can’t quell public dissent by ceasing to collect taxes. That toggle doesn’t exist. Perhaps because, where Dark Elves are concerned, ‘taxes’ are a euphemism for ‘keeping a few people wealthy by working prisoners to death’.

Slaves are also the grim currency by which the Dark Elf faction pays for a new, universal mechanical addition to Total War: Warhammer 2 ; Rites. They love a good mass sacrifice.

Sixteen months after the launch of Total War: Warhammer , Creative Assembly have developed and released a second entry that’s both conventional stand-alone sequel, and a significant expansion towards a planned trilogy of combined titles. Total War: Warhammer 2 will, ultimately, hook up with the first game and all of its factions for a ‘Mortal Empires’ campaign that will span (a version of) the Old and New Worlds. For now though it is a stand-alone follow-up, with four new factions and plenty of applied lessons from the past year-and-some spent on the series.

Players who closely followed the first Total Warhammer and its steady flow of paid and free DLC will know that Creative Assembly leaned heavily into the idea of faction diversity. Some of the mechanics that were technically unique at launch, weaker stuff like the Empire’s political offices, were eclipsed by later additions like Bretonnia’s peasant economy or Norsca’s monster hunt quests. That confident approach to merging lore and flavour with the moving parts of a strategy game has continued in Total War: Warhammer 2 , which pushes the factional distinctions even further with its four races.

The vast majority of my time has been spent in command of Malekith’s torture-happy Dark Elves, so I’ll be using them as the bulk of my examples. That’s no slight on the other three (Lizardmen, Skaven, High Elves), who from what I’ve experienced have just as many specialties of their own. Total War: Warhammer 2’s main campaign is much longer than Warhammer’s , so I made the choice to primarily relive my teenaged tabletop years with the Dark Elves. Except without Games Workshop charging me a tenner for every new bolt thrower.

Dark Elves are sadistic types, led by a guy who once had a reasonable claim to the High Elf throne but has long since torpedoed his eligibility by embracing murder, slavery, goth rock, and a thoroughly weird relationship with his mum. When a Dark Elf army chooses to take captives after a battle those prisoners show up as a resource and start to generate income, instead of just vanishing to some invisible slave mill.

Having captives show up as a tangible number (that’s just for Dark Elves, the other factions have their own special mechanics), affects several of the strategic choices a player will be making. Certain building chains and technology choices tie directly into the slave economy. Public order will also be affected if cities get absurdly packed with captives, and, unless this was a review build oversight, the Dark Elves can’t quell public dissent by ceasing to collect taxes. That toggle doesn’t exist. Perhaps because, where Dark Elves are concerned, ‘taxes’ are a euphemism for ‘keeping a few people wealthy by working prisoners to death’.

Slaves are also the grim currency by which the Dark Elf faction pays for a new, universal mechanical addition to Total War: Warhammer 2 ; Rites. They love a good mass sacrifice.

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Philip Kaufman’s 1978 remake was a nervy modern classic, Abel Ferrara’s 1993 Body Snatchers transferred the scenario with mixed results to a military base, and the less said about The Invasion (2007), with Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig doing catatonic impressions of themselves, the better. But it all started here, in the B movie to end – or transcend – them all.

Don Siegel and producer Walter Wanger were quick off the mark in adapting Jack Finney’s 1955 novel. They shot the film in under a month and for less than $400,000. It was intended as a B thriller, no more, no less: the many layers of political allegory which generations of viewers have since disinterred were quite some way from the makers’ thoughts.

Of course, it’s the very open-endedness of the film’s subtext that gives it power. When a sleepy California town is overrun, first by the outbreak of a strange delusion that people have been replaced by doppelgangers, but then gradually by the doppelgangers themselves, the film is brilliantly placed, however unwittingly, to illustrate America’s political paranoia from both ends.

The creeping dread of communism in ordinary homes can be read as an anxiety the script goes on to justify, from one point of view, and the finger-pointing suspicions of the townsfolk feel like a witch-hunt, of sorts. But the much graver threat is one of the tables being turned, normality outnumbered, the finger pointing back. By the end, one McCarthy (Kevin, the lead actor) feels very much like the victim of his namesake, Senator Joe – a man blacklisted by a hyper-conformist totalitarian society and sent into panicked exile.

Siegel is never guilty of overthinking all this. He builds the film with eerie simplicity and calm. He and the photographer, Ellsworth Fredericks, knew that the best way to frame hysteria was to make its surroundings, and even the camera movements, as placid and uninflected as possible. The actors go crazy while the film retains its dry, clinical sanity to the last. The pod people, unstoppable in their spread, say they have no need for love or emotion. While they’re at it, they could iron out some other perplexing and erratic human behaviours, like Dana Wynter’s inexplicable penchant for a two-minute boiled egg.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) re-release. Dir: Don Siegel. Starring: Kevin McCarthy, Dana Wynter, Larry Gates, King Donovan, Carolyn Jones, Virginia Christine. PG cert, 80 min.

Sixteen months after the launch of Total War: Warhammer , Creative Assembly have developed and released a second entry that’s both conventional stand-alone sequel, and a significant expansion towards a planned trilogy of combined titles. Total War: Warhammer 2 will, ultimately, hook up with the first game and all of its factions for a ‘Mortal Empires’ campaign that will span (a version of) the Old and New Worlds. For now though it is a stand-alone follow-up, with four new factions and plenty of applied lessons from the past year-and-some spent on the series.

Players who closely followed the first Total Warhammer and its steady flow of paid and free DLC will know that Creative Assembly leaned heavily into the idea of faction diversity. Some of the mechanics that were technically unique at launch, weaker stuff like the Empire’s political offices, were eclipsed by later additions like Bretonnia’s peasant economy or Norsca’s monster hunt quests. That confident approach to merging lore and flavour with the moving parts of a strategy game has continued in Total War: Warhammer 2 , which pushes the factional distinctions even further with its four races.

The vast majority of my time has been spent in command of Malekith’s torture-happy Dark Elves, so I’ll be using them as the bulk of my examples. That’s no slight on the other three (Lizardmen, Skaven, High Elves), who from what I’ve experienced have just as many specialties of their own. Total War: Warhammer 2’s main campaign is much longer than Warhammer’s , so I made the choice to primarily relive my teenaged tabletop years with the Dark Elves. Except without Games Workshop charging me a tenner for every new bolt thrower.

Dark Elves are sadistic types, led by a guy who once had a reasonable claim to the High Elf throne but has long since torpedoed his eligibility by embracing murder, slavery, goth rock, and a thoroughly weird relationship with his mum. When a Dark Elf army chooses to take captives after a battle those prisoners show up as a resource and start to generate income, instead of just vanishing to some invisible slave mill.

Having captives show up as a tangible number (that’s just for Dark Elves, the other factions have their own special mechanics), affects several of the strategic choices a player will be making. Certain building chains and technology choices tie directly into the slave economy. Public order will also be affected if cities get absurdly packed with captives, and, unless this was a review build oversight, the Dark Elves can’t quell public dissent by ceasing to collect taxes. That toggle doesn’t exist. Perhaps because, where Dark Elves are concerned, ‘taxes’ are a euphemism for ‘keeping a few people wealthy by working prisoners to death’.

Slaves are also the grim currency by which the Dark Elf faction pays for a new, universal mechanical addition to Total War: Warhammer 2 ; Rites. They love a good mass sacrifice.

© IMDb.com , Inc. or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Box Office Mojo and IMDb are trademarks or registered trademarks of IMDb.com, Inc. or its affiliates. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy under which this service is provided to you.



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