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Radical Praise - Gospel Warriors



Women of Radical Praise Empowerment Manual: Home Girls - The Get Real Series (Volume 1)

If you're ready to get your praise on, these songs will definitely help get you started as they get you up on your feet, thanking the Lord for His goodness.

You're not really into dancing (You turned my mourning into dancing)
but my heart is full of joy (my heart is full of joy)
I will praise You
You healed my body and You made me new

Jesus we crown You with singing, the instruments lift up Your name
with all of our hearts
Jesus You are victorious, righteous, Redeemer
We crown You with praise

This song made news in April of 2014 when a 9-year-old boy who was kidnapped from the driveway of his Atlanta home by a stranger sang the song repeatedly for three hours until his kidnapper let him go. The story gives praise a whole new meaning!

From Brenton Brown's Dove-nominated debut solo album, "Hosanna (Praise Is Rising)" brings a sense of hope to listeners.

Heal my heart and make it clean
Open up my eyes to the things unseen
Show me how to love like You have loved me
Break my heart for what breaks Yours
Everything I am for Your Kingdom's cause
As I walk from earth into eternity

“There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. . It was for freedom that Christ set us free; therefore keep standing firm and do not be subject again to a yoke of slavery” (Galatians 3:28; 5:1).

The greatest social revolution in the history of mankind has occurred in this century: namely, the radical change in the status of women relative to men. Possibilities have exploded for women today which their great grandmothers could scarcely have imagined. For the first time in human history women have achieved full equality and relative parity with men in virtually every area of Western society, except the church!

Is it, however, really that simple? Paul writes, just as unambiguously, “Slaves, in all things obey those who are your masters. . Masters, grant to your slaves justice and fairness” (Col. 3:22; 4:1). Generations of Christians used such scriptures to justify what John Wesley called “that most vile of sinful institutions,” slavery. Other practices are defended as “biblical,” such as the separation of the races, anti-Semitism, polygamy, Saturday worship, wine drinking, dancing, snake handling, tongues speaking, works salvation, and divorce. Biblical support can be cited for infanticide and genocide.

Women have constituted the most discriminated against majority in the history of mankind. In every civilization, every culture, every race, every nation, and every religion—at least until the twentieth century—women have been denied citizenship, an education, civil or legal rights, and a voice or a vote in any public assembly. Women did not gain the right to vote in our country until 1920. They have been regarded by whole cultures as a subhuman species whose sole purpose was to bear children and serve at the whim and command of men. They have been treated as property to be bought, sold, or cast aside when they no longer served men’s purposes.

It is not until Genesis 3 that we read these words, invariably cited as support for women’s subordination, “To the woman He said, ‘. . your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you'” (3:16). What is of vital importance to note is that the subordination of woman to man is part of the curse of sin after the fall, and does not represent God’s original intention for male-female relationships. It stands, like the curse of death, as a prediction of the consequence of the Fall rather than a prescription of God’s ideal order.

We do not find, in Jesus, any expression of the shabby way in which women were treated in his day. To the contrary, He viewed them as choice and chosen daughters of the Most High God. He always treated women with the utmost dignity and respect. Women may have been locked out of the synagogue but they were welcome wherever he was and whenever he taught. He was as sensitive to the needs of a poor woman who touched the hem of his garment as those of the synagogue ruler whose daughter had just died. Women were among his closest friends and followers. He and the disciples depended upon them largely for their support. Women were the last at the cross and the first to the tomb.

March is Women’s History Month. While most publications and narratives will feature prominent women like Susan B. Anthony, Amelia Earhart, Anne Frank, or maybe Jackie Onassis Kennedy, few will focus on the unique legacies of radical Black women whose activism pushed the church and the country to be fairer, equitable, and more just for all people.

Terrell, born in 1863 – as the legal institution of slavery was coming to a slow end in the United States, was the daughter of former slaves and a woman who centered her early activism on women’s suffrage. She championed women’s organizations, becoming a founder and first president of the National Association of Colored Women in 1896. She later became a charter member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. A prominent member of the A. M. E. church, Terrell fought tirelessly for the liberation of Black people until her death in 1954, just after the de-segregation victory of Brown v. Board of Education .

While neither Terrell nor Cooper had the honor of witnessing the much heralded work of their contemporaries, they seeded the vision and manifestation of radical liberation work today. They are exemplars of radical Black women’s legacies and our inevitable connectedness to the work of our foremothers without which we would have no foundations for the justice we week today.

So, today – like everyday, we must see radical Black women’s work as transcending time and calendar dates. Their work in the past and present informs our possible futures. It’s time to recognize them as the pioneers they were and are.

Praise GOD for “rebellious detractors” in the world and the church universal. The word has to go out somehow…remember, the sweaky wheel gets oiled!

If you're ready to get your praise on, these songs will definitely help get you started as they get you up on your feet, thanking the Lord for His goodness.

You're not really into dancing (You turned my mourning into dancing)
but my heart is full of joy (my heart is full of joy)
I will praise You
You healed my body and You made me new

Jesus we crown You with singing, the instruments lift up Your name
with all of our hearts
Jesus You are victorious, righteous, Redeemer
We crown You with praise

This song made news in April of 2014 when a 9-year-old boy who was kidnapped from the driveway of his Atlanta home by a stranger sang the song repeatedly for three hours until his kidnapper let him go. The story gives praise a whole new meaning!

From Brenton Brown's Dove-nominated debut solo album, "Hosanna (Praise Is Rising)" brings a sense of hope to listeners.

Heal my heart and make it clean
Open up my eyes to the things unseen
Show me how to love like You have loved me
Break my heart for what breaks Yours
Everything I am for Your Kingdom's cause
As I walk from earth into eternity

If you're ready to get your praise on, these songs will definitely help get you started as they get you up on your feet, thanking the Lord for His goodness.

You're not really into dancing (You turned my mourning into dancing)
but my heart is full of joy (my heart is full of joy)
I will praise You
You healed my body and You made me new

Jesus we crown You with singing, the instruments lift up Your name
with all of our hearts
Jesus You are victorious, righteous, Redeemer
We crown You with praise

This song made news in April of 2014 when a 9-year-old boy who was kidnapped from the driveway of his Atlanta home by a stranger sang the song repeatedly for three hours until his kidnapper let him go. The story gives praise a whole new meaning!

From Brenton Brown's Dove-nominated debut solo album, "Hosanna (Praise Is Rising)" brings a sense of hope to listeners.

Heal my heart and make it clean
Open up my eyes to the things unseen
Show me how to love like You have loved me
Break my heart for what breaks Yours
Everything I am for Your Kingdom's cause
As I walk from earth into eternity

“There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. . It was for freedom that Christ set us free; therefore keep standing firm and do not be subject again to a yoke of slavery” (Galatians 3:28; 5:1).

The greatest social revolution in the history of mankind has occurred in this century: namely, the radical change in the status of women relative to men. Possibilities have exploded for women today which their great grandmothers could scarcely have imagined. For the first time in human history women have achieved full equality and relative parity with men in virtually every area of Western society, except the church!

Is it, however, really that simple? Paul writes, just as unambiguously, “Slaves, in all things obey those who are your masters. . Masters, grant to your slaves justice and fairness” (Col. 3:22; 4:1). Generations of Christians used such scriptures to justify what John Wesley called “that most vile of sinful institutions,” slavery. Other practices are defended as “biblical,” such as the separation of the races, anti-Semitism, polygamy, Saturday worship, wine drinking, dancing, snake handling, tongues speaking, works salvation, and divorce. Biblical support can be cited for infanticide and genocide.

Women have constituted the most discriminated against majority in the history of mankind. In every civilization, every culture, every race, every nation, and every religion—at least until the twentieth century—women have been denied citizenship, an education, civil or legal rights, and a voice or a vote in any public assembly. Women did not gain the right to vote in our country until 1920. They have been regarded by whole cultures as a subhuman species whose sole purpose was to bear children and serve at the whim and command of men. They have been treated as property to be bought, sold, or cast aside when they no longer served men’s purposes.

It is not until Genesis 3 that we read these words, invariably cited as support for women’s subordination, “To the woman He said, ‘. . your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you'” (3:16). What is of vital importance to note is that the subordination of woman to man is part of the curse of sin after the fall, and does not represent God’s original intention for male-female relationships. It stands, like the curse of death, as a prediction of the consequence of the Fall rather than a prescription of God’s ideal order.

We do not find, in Jesus, any expression of the shabby way in which women were treated in his day. To the contrary, He viewed them as choice and chosen daughters of the Most High God. He always treated women with the utmost dignity and respect. Women may have been locked out of the synagogue but they were welcome wherever he was and whenever he taught. He was as sensitive to the needs of a poor woman who touched the hem of his garment as those of the synagogue ruler whose daughter had just died. Women were among his closest friends and followers. He and the disciples depended upon them largely for their support. Women were the last at the cross and the first to the tomb.



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