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A Tour of Your Respiratory System (First Graphics: Body Systems)

Booking a concert tour isn't much different from booking a local gig -- you're just doing it on a much larger scale. It’s probably no surprise that taking a band out on tour is expensive. Even a bare bones tour where everyone sleeps in the van and lives on pretzels will cost more than you’re anticipating.

Booking a concert tour is a great way to expand your audience, but there are a lot of things to consider before you strike out in the van.

If you’re an artist or part of a band hitting the road to build a name for yourself, then you're not likely to make much money from your shows. The tour is likely to be an out-of-pocket adventure, so your budget will need to encompass every stage of planning. Know exactly how much you can afford to spend before you hit the road.

The tricky part of creating a tour budget for your first tour is that there are a lot of unknown variables. You might be able to calculate a rough idea of what you’ll make per show, but always low-ball those estimates, and err on the side of caution if you’re not sure.

Working through a budget will help you figure out where you can trim costs, it will also help you flag things you may have skipped in your planning.

So where do you want to play? Make a wish list, keeping in mind you have to consider budget first and other factors second. As touring costs a lot, getting the most bang for your buck is critical. One of the best ways to get value for money is choosing your touring destinations wisely.

A couple of Dutch cities lead the way in street art, and Rotterdam is one of them. A street art tour takes you along the highlights of the city, as well as some nice lesser known neighbourhoods and hotspots while spotting some excellent murals. Sounds good, doesn’t it? Join me on my street art tour in Rotterdam.

I feel like The Netherlands are a bit late in discovering the power of street art. Countries like Belgium Portugal and the US have known for ages, or so it seems, that street art is something more than just graffiti or spray-canned works. Street art can brighten up otherwise dreary neighbourhoods, address local social problems or highlight nature or traditions so typical for the area. But we are slowly catching up.

Over the last few years, famous foreign artists have left their mark on Dutch streets, but The Netherlands have also produced some now famous names. Heerlen, Goes and Breda have hosted street art festivals. And Rotterdam is also an excellent city to spot street art.

On weekends there is a street art tour that you can join. It starts at noon at Rotterdam Central Station and takes about three hours. If you’d rather discover the city at your own pace, I highly recommend downloading the Rewriters app . It’s in Dutch, which may make things a bit tricky, but at least you can see where all the murals are. If you follow this route, you will catch multiple birds with one stone: whilst spotting over 40 pieces of street art, the route will guide you along the cities’ highlights, lesser known neighbourhoods and some excellent spots for a drink or bite to eat.

A short stroll will take you from Rotterdam central station to Hofbogen, near Rotterdam Hofplein station, where the first collection of street art can be admired. First of all, there’s the three-dimensional work of Rotterdam born Ozon who chose a failed piece of ceramics as a subject for his work. After having coffee at Hofbogen ( Lokaal is pretty good) walk cross the train tracks using the ‘Luchtsingel’ while looking back at the hip hop inspired mural by Opperclaes XL.

Street art can also teach you quite a bit about the place you’re visiting. Two murals that can teach you a little about Rotterdam are near the Maritime Museum. Artist collective Lastplak created a giant, colourful and cartoon like mural, and it’s pretty easy to make out typical Rotterdam icons like Euromast, the cubic houses, Erasmus bridge (which has been nicknamed The Swan) and Rotterdam harbour.

Sure, you’ll visit the Eiffel Tower, and the Arc de Triomphe, but to glimpse a more authentic Paris , consider taking a few detours. Unique memories are sometimes made in the most unexpected places, so stash a copy of this article inside your travel guide when you head to Paris.

At school we called it an overview: a little taste of the things we’d study more thoroughly in the future. In Paris, the effective overview is a Segway tour.

Segways are those two-wheeled scooter-like contraptions that you ride standing up. They look a little like an old-fashioned lawnmower with a platform for standing.

The four members of our tour, all new to Segways, were a bit wobbly at first. After about twenty minutes we were riding around as if we dodged Paris traffic every day.

Our knowledgeable guide from Fat Tire Bike Tours led us on an adventure past L’Ecole Militaire, Hôtel des Invalides, La Place de la Concorde (which saw the end of Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, countless Parisians, and every year’s Tour de France), over some notable Seine bridges, through the Tuileries (we had to walk our Segways lawnmower-style since motorized vehicles are not allowed), and finally to the Louvre.

Not only did we attract a lot of attention (we’re in a lot of tourist snapshots, I’m sure), we had a lot of fun and snapped unique pictures of each other perched on our Segways in front of famous Parisian landmarks.

VoiceMap is a publishing platform for location-aware audio tours. Creating your own audio walk, cycle , riverboat cruise , drive or even rocketship ride is free, and our tools come bundled with the support, enthusiasm and expertise of our editors.

VoiceMap was founded by storytellers, and we’ve used our experience to simplify the process of making a tour. In three steps — map, write, record — you can publish and sell your own VoiceMap. It’ll be available here, at voicemap.me, and from our iOS and Android audio tour apps .

Our storytelling tutorial guides you through the process of mapping your tour, writing your script and recording the audio. Or, for an overview of the process, take a look at this infographic .

We assign an editor to every project, to help you make the most of this new technology. They’ll help you get to grips with the tool and make sure that your audience looks left and turns right exactly when you want them to.

Our editors are also all storytellers who have published with VoiceMap themselves, and they can help with other things too. You’ll have as much or as little help as you need.

You’ll have access to live sales reports for your published tours, with estimated royalties. Payments are made via Paypal when royalties are equal to or greater than USD100 at the end of the month.

Booking a concert tour isn't much different from booking a local gig -- you're just doing it on a much larger scale. It’s probably no surprise that taking a band out on tour is expensive. Even a bare bones tour where everyone sleeps in the van and lives on pretzels will cost more than you’re anticipating.

Booking a concert tour is a great way to expand your audience, but there are a lot of things to consider before you strike out in the van.

If you’re an artist or part of a band hitting the road to build a name for yourself, then you're not likely to make much money from your shows. The tour is likely to be an out-of-pocket adventure, so your budget will need to encompass every stage of planning. Know exactly how much you can afford to spend before you hit the road.

The tricky part of creating a tour budget for your first tour is that there are a lot of unknown variables. You might be able to calculate a rough idea of what you’ll make per show, but always low-ball those estimates, and err on the side of caution if you’re not sure.

Working through a budget will help you figure out where you can trim costs, it will also help you flag things you may have skipped in your planning.

So where do you want to play? Make a wish list, keeping in mind you have to consider budget first and other factors second. As touring costs a lot, getting the most bang for your buck is critical. One of the best ways to get value for money is choosing your touring destinations wisely.

A couple of Dutch cities lead the way in street art, and Rotterdam is one of them. A street art tour takes you along the highlights of the city, as well as some nice lesser known neighbourhoods and hotspots while spotting some excellent murals. Sounds good, doesn’t it? Join me on my street art tour in Rotterdam.

I feel like The Netherlands are a bit late in discovering the power of street art. Countries like Belgium Portugal and the US have known for ages, or so it seems, that street art is something more than just graffiti or spray-canned works. Street art can brighten up otherwise dreary neighbourhoods, address local social problems or highlight nature or traditions so typical for the area. But we are slowly catching up.

Over the last few years, famous foreign artists have left their mark on Dutch streets, but The Netherlands have also produced some now famous names. Heerlen, Goes and Breda have hosted street art festivals. And Rotterdam is also an excellent city to spot street art.

On weekends there is a street art tour that you can join. It starts at noon at Rotterdam Central Station and takes about three hours. If you’d rather discover the city at your own pace, I highly recommend downloading the Rewriters app . It’s in Dutch, which may make things a bit tricky, but at least you can see where all the murals are. If you follow this route, you will catch multiple birds with one stone: whilst spotting over 40 pieces of street art, the route will guide you along the cities’ highlights, lesser known neighbourhoods and some excellent spots for a drink or bite to eat.

A short stroll will take you from Rotterdam central station to Hofbogen, near Rotterdam Hofplein station, where the first collection of street art can be admired. First of all, there’s the three-dimensional work of Rotterdam born Ozon who chose a failed piece of ceramics as a subject for his work. After having coffee at Hofbogen ( Lokaal is pretty good) walk cross the train tracks using the ‘Luchtsingel’ while looking back at the hip hop inspired mural by Opperclaes XL.

Street art can also teach you quite a bit about the place you’re visiting. Two murals that can teach you a little about Rotterdam are near the Maritime Museum. Artist collective Lastplak created a giant, colourful and cartoon like mural, and it’s pretty easy to make out typical Rotterdam icons like Euromast, the cubic houses, Erasmus bridge (which has been nicknamed The Swan) and Rotterdam harbour.

Sure, you’ll visit the Eiffel Tower, and the Arc de Triomphe, but to glimpse a more authentic Paris , consider taking a few detours. Unique memories are sometimes made in the most unexpected places, so stash a copy of this article inside your travel guide when you head to Paris.

At school we called it an overview: a little taste of the things we’d study more thoroughly in the future. In Paris, the effective overview is a Segway tour.

Segways are those two-wheeled scooter-like contraptions that you ride standing up. They look a little like an old-fashioned lawnmower with a platform for standing.

The four members of our tour, all new to Segways, were a bit wobbly at first. After about twenty minutes we were riding around as if we dodged Paris traffic every day.

Our knowledgeable guide from Fat Tire Bike Tours led us on an adventure past L’Ecole Militaire, Hôtel des Invalides, La Place de la Concorde (which saw the end of Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, countless Parisians, and every year’s Tour de France), over some notable Seine bridges, through the Tuileries (we had to walk our Segways lawnmower-style since motorized vehicles are not allowed), and finally to the Louvre.

Not only did we attract a lot of attention (we’re in a lot of tourist snapshots, I’m sure), we had a lot of fun and snapped unique pictures of each other perched on our Segways in front of famous Parisian landmarks.

Booking a concert tour isn't much different from booking a local gig -- you're just doing it on a much larger scale. It’s probably no surprise that taking a band out on tour is expensive. Even a bare bones tour where everyone sleeps in the van and lives on pretzels will cost more than you’re anticipating.

Booking a concert tour is a great way to expand your audience, but there are a lot of things to consider before you strike out in the van.

If you’re an artist or part of a band hitting the road to build a name for yourself, then you're not likely to make much money from your shows. The tour is likely to be an out-of-pocket adventure, so your budget will need to encompass every stage of planning. Know exactly how much you can afford to spend before you hit the road.

The tricky part of creating a tour budget for your first tour is that there are a lot of unknown variables. You might be able to calculate a rough idea of what you’ll make per show, but always low-ball those estimates, and err on the side of caution if you’re not sure.

Working through a budget will help you figure out where you can trim costs, it will also help you flag things you may have skipped in your planning.

So where do you want to play? Make a wish list, keeping in mind you have to consider budget first and other factors second. As touring costs a lot, getting the most bang for your buck is critical. One of the best ways to get value for money is choosing your touring destinations wisely.

Booking a concert tour isn't much different from booking a local gig -- you're just doing it on a much larger scale. It’s probably no surprise that taking a band out on tour is expensive. Even a bare bones tour where everyone sleeps in the van and lives on pretzels will cost more than you’re anticipating.

Booking a concert tour is a great way to expand your audience, but there are a lot of things to consider before you strike out in the van.

If you’re an artist or part of a band hitting the road to build a name for yourself, then you're not likely to make much money from your shows. The tour is likely to be an out-of-pocket adventure, so your budget will need to encompass every stage of planning. Know exactly how much you can afford to spend before you hit the road.

The tricky part of creating a tour budget for your first tour is that there are a lot of unknown variables. You might be able to calculate a rough idea of what you’ll make per show, but always low-ball those estimates, and err on the side of caution if you’re not sure.

Working through a budget will help you figure out where you can trim costs, it will also help you flag things you may have skipped in your planning.

So where do you want to play? Make a wish list, keeping in mind you have to consider budget first and other factors second. As touring costs a lot, getting the most bang for your buck is critical. One of the best ways to get value for money is choosing your touring destinations wisely.

A couple of Dutch cities lead the way in street art, and Rotterdam is one of them. A street art tour takes you along the highlights of the city, as well as some nice lesser known neighbourhoods and hotspots while spotting some excellent murals. Sounds good, doesn’t it? Join me on my street art tour in Rotterdam.

I feel like The Netherlands are a bit late in discovering the power of street art. Countries like Belgium Portugal and the US have known for ages, or so it seems, that street art is something more than just graffiti or spray-canned works. Street art can brighten up otherwise dreary neighbourhoods, address local social problems or highlight nature or traditions so typical for the area. But we are slowly catching up.

Over the last few years, famous foreign artists have left their mark on Dutch streets, but The Netherlands have also produced some now famous names. Heerlen, Goes and Breda have hosted street art festivals. And Rotterdam is also an excellent city to spot street art.

On weekends there is a street art tour that you can join. It starts at noon at Rotterdam Central Station and takes about three hours. If you’d rather discover the city at your own pace, I highly recommend downloading the Rewriters app . It’s in Dutch, which may make things a bit tricky, but at least you can see where all the murals are. If you follow this route, you will catch multiple birds with one stone: whilst spotting over 40 pieces of street art, the route will guide you along the cities’ highlights, lesser known neighbourhoods and some excellent spots for a drink or bite to eat.

A short stroll will take you from Rotterdam central station to Hofbogen, near Rotterdam Hofplein station, where the first collection of street art can be admired. First of all, there’s the three-dimensional work of Rotterdam born Ozon who chose a failed piece of ceramics as a subject for his work. After having coffee at Hofbogen ( Lokaal is pretty good) walk cross the train tracks using the ‘Luchtsingel’ while looking back at the hip hop inspired mural by Opperclaes XL.

Street art can also teach you quite a bit about the place you’re visiting. Two murals that can teach you a little about Rotterdam are near the Maritime Museum. Artist collective Lastplak created a giant, colourful and cartoon like mural, and it’s pretty easy to make out typical Rotterdam icons like Euromast, the cubic houses, Erasmus bridge (which has been nicknamed The Swan) and Rotterdam harbour.



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