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The Living History Classroom, Vol. 4: An Educational Service; November, 1994 (Classic Reprint)

LivingHistoryNetwork.com is all about connecting people who are interested in history. One way to do that is with an on-line calendar and directory that are map-based so that reenactors and members of the public can find all the special gatherings and events occurring near them — whether it be a reenacting event, or a special program offered at an historic site, or museum. Also, if you’re in charge of a living history group (e.g., a military unit), we hope you’ll use this site to communicate with your existing members about upcoming events as well as to recruit new members.

Tony Pierro of Swampscott, Mass., is the last living U.S. veteran to have seen action at the bloody Meuse and Argonne offensives. He is 110 now. (Enlarge to see the full version of Pierro's 1918 enlistment photo.) Richard Pierro/Will Everett hide caption

The World War I Living History Project , a two-hour radio documentary hosted by Walter Cronkite, tells the stories of 12 of the remaning 14 veterans of World War I. For photos, video and audio of the men, visit the program's Web site .

Veterans Day, which is Saturday, was once called Armistice Day. It marked the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918 when the guns fell silent in Europe, and the doughboys and sailors and Marines who'd gone to fight World War I could come home.

In the 88 years since, these men, too, have fallen silent. More than 4 million Americans served in World War I. Only 14 are left. The youngest is 106, the oldest 115.

Tony Pierro, who is 110 years old, is the last living U.S. veteran to have seen action at the bloody Meuse and Argonne offensives. An average of a thousand Americans died each day in the three weeks of fighting.

These men fought a war that isn't talked about much anymore. They lived before the invention of the airplane and beyond the advent of the Internet.

La Trobe University’s Living History project celebrates the diverse stories of our students, alumni, staff and supporters over the past 50 years. Throughout 2017 we will continue to share these stories – so be sure to keep an eye on this page for more videos.

LivingHistoryNetwork.com is all about connecting people who are interested in history. One way to do that is with an on-line calendar and directory that are map-based so that reenactors and members of the public can find all the special gatherings and events occurring near them — whether it be a reenacting event, or a special program offered at an historic site, or museum. Also, if you’re in charge of a living history group (e.g., a military unit), we hope you’ll use this site to communicate with your existing members about upcoming events as well as to recruit new members.

Tony Pierro of Swampscott, Mass., is the last living U.S. veteran to have seen action at the bloody Meuse and Argonne offensives. He is 110 now. (Enlarge to see the full version of Pierro's 1918 enlistment photo.) Richard Pierro/Will Everett hide caption

The World War I Living History Project , a two-hour radio documentary hosted by Walter Cronkite, tells the stories of 12 of the remaning 14 veterans of World War I. For photos, video and audio of the men, visit the program's Web site .

Veterans Day, which is Saturday, was once called Armistice Day. It marked the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918 when the guns fell silent in Europe, and the doughboys and sailors and Marines who'd gone to fight World War I could come home.

In the 88 years since, these men, too, have fallen silent. More than 4 million Americans served in World War I. Only 14 are left. The youngest is 106, the oldest 115.

Tony Pierro, who is 110 years old, is the last living U.S. veteran to have seen action at the bloody Meuse and Argonne offensives. An average of a thousand Americans died each day in the three weeks of fighting.

These men fought a war that isn't talked about much anymore. They lived before the invention of the airplane and beyond the advent of the Internet.

LivingHistoryNetwork.com is all about connecting people who are interested in history. One way to do that is with an on-line calendar and directory that are map-based so that reenactors and members of the public can find all the special gatherings and events occurring near them — whether it be a reenacting event, or a special program offered at an historic site, or museum. Also, if you’re in charge of a living history group (e.g., a military unit), we hope you’ll use this site to communicate with your existing members about upcoming events as well as to recruit new members.



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