Amazon.com: Neperud Trees And Weeds

gumbo limbo trees - University of Florida



Trees And Weeds (Limbo Chronicles Book 1)

With intensely hot and humid summers, a fast-growing shade tree in Florida is a welcome landscape asset. Winter frosts are rare in southernmost counties, so more tropical species can be utilized. In the Panhandle and Central Florida, focus on trees that handle cold as low as 15 to 20 degrees F before planting in your landscape. A deciduous tree allows winter sun to penetrate, while an evergreen shades the ground year round. Always avoid weedy, ecologically-invasive tree species.

Native to northern Florida, the sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) displays pointy-lobed, maple-like leaves that turn shades of red, orange and yellow in November. It reaches maturity at 60 to 80 feet. Choose a fruitless variety like 'Rotundifolia' so you don't have to step on or mow over the spiky seed balls in your lawn. This tree grows well all over the state except in areas more southerly than Tampa or Melbourne.

The American plane tree, growing to 80 feet tall, is more often called the sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) while the London plane tree (Platanus x acerifolia) is a hybrid between American and European species and matures 80 to 90 feet tall. Use either tree to be a large lawn shade tree or street tree in northern and central Florida counties no further south than roughly Orlando. The hot summers and sandy soils often cause plane tree leaves to prematurely brown by August or September. Leaves are large and drop away naturally in October.

In tropical southern Florida, the royal poinciana, or flamboyant (Delonix regia), grows quickly and also provides showy flower displays in May and June. Although fast growing, it has many surface roots and therefore is not good around driveways and sidewalks, and it can be difficult to maintain both turf grass or shady garden plants under its boughs. The feathery leaves drop away in winter with the dry season and cool weather. Grow it no farther north than Lake Okeechobee unless along the coast. Typically it reaches 30 feet tall, but extremely old trees can be 40 to 50 feet in height.

Perhaps the best crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) for use as a shade tree is 'Natchez.' Its wide, umbrella-like canopy is filled with white flowers in early summer, and it has flaky cinnamon-colored bark. It can grow as much as 3 or 4 feet a year if soils are fertile and ample moisture is provided during the growing season. The 'Natchez' crape myrtle matures to 25 to 30 feet tall.

In southern Florida, massive tropical fig trees (Ficus spp.) provide dense year-round shade in parks and along streets. While much too large in scale for most residential properties, they can be nice at golf courses or parks with mature heights of 50 to 80 feet and up to 100 feet wide. Use caution as some species are invasive, dropping their seeds and sprouting up like weeds. Choose the native stranger fig (Ficus aurea) as a sound choice for a fast-growing shade tree, as it is more resilient to tropical storm stresses. It matures 40 to 60 feet tall and almost as wide.


Vegetation The subtropical climate and abundant summer moisture of southern Florida supports rich vegetation in the glades. There are 100 species of seed bearing plants in the park and 120 species of trees. Many plants in the Everglades are found nowhere else on earth.

One of the most significant plants in the ecology of the glades is the mangrove family. The Everglades contain the greatest mangrove forest in North America. One member of the family, the red mangrove, is seen below along the shores of West Lake. One of the red mangrove's critical functions is its role in stabilizing the shoreline with its roots.

The red mangrove is usually found along the shore. The water around the base of the trees is often stained brown, a side effect of the tannin contained in the green, waxy leaves which fall into the water gradually throughout the year. Red mangrove bark is used to tan leather.

The most distinct and recognizable feature of the red mangrove is its stilt-like root system. The tree is sometimes known as the "walking mangrove" as the roots resemble legs in the water. The red mangrove also reproduces by dropping "propagules" which can take root and start a new tree.

This closeup of the the mangrove "legs" shows just how tangled the mangrove forest can become and why it is called a "mangle." The mangrove begins to grow these "prop" roots after a couple of years. Although the roots themselves may only penetrate a few inches into the in the soft mud in which it usually grows they hold the tree upright and keep it steady in hurricane winds which it eventually faces.

In addition to its role building and anchoring land, the red mangrove is also crucial to the Everglades ecosystem as a nursery for crustaceans and invertebrates. Mangrove swamps are among the most productive natural communities on the plant.

With intensely hot and humid summers, a fast-growing shade tree in Florida is a welcome landscape asset. Winter frosts are rare in southernmost counties, so more tropical species can be utilized. In the Panhandle and Central Florida, focus on trees that handle cold as low as 15 to 20 degrees F before planting in your landscape. A deciduous tree allows winter sun to penetrate, while an evergreen shades the ground year round. Always avoid weedy, ecologically-invasive tree species.

Native to northern Florida, the sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) displays pointy-lobed, maple-like leaves that turn shades of red, orange and yellow in November. It reaches maturity at 60 to 80 feet. Choose a fruitless variety like 'Rotundifolia' so you don't have to step on or mow over the spiky seed balls in your lawn. This tree grows well all over the state except in areas more southerly than Tampa or Melbourne.

The American plane tree, growing to 80 feet tall, is more often called the sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) while the London plane tree (Platanus x acerifolia) is a hybrid between American and European species and matures 80 to 90 feet tall. Use either tree to be a large lawn shade tree or street tree in northern and central Florida counties no further south than roughly Orlando. The hot summers and sandy soils often cause plane tree leaves to prematurely brown by August or September. Leaves are large and drop away naturally in October.

In tropical southern Florida, the royal poinciana, or flamboyant (Delonix regia), grows quickly and also provides showy flower displays in May and June. Although fast growing, it has many surface roots and therefore is not good around driveways and sidewalks, and it can be difficult to maintain both turf grass or shady garden plants under its boughs. The feathery leaves drop away in winter with the dry season and cool weather. Grow it no farther north than Lake Okeechobee unless along the coast. Typically it reaches 30 feet tall, but extremely old trees can be 40 to 50 feet in height.

Perhaps the best crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) for use as a shade tree is 'Natchez.' Its wide, umbrella-like canopy is filled with white flowers in early summer, and it has flaky cinnamon-colored bark. It can grow as much as 3 or 4 feet a year if soils are fertile and ample moisture is provided during the growing season. The 'Natchez' crape myrtle matures to 25 to 30 feet tall.

In southern Florida, massive tropical fig trees (Ficus spp.) provide dense year-round shade in parks and along streets. While much too large in scale for most residential properties, they can be nice at golf courses or parks with mature heights of 50 to 80 feet and up to 100 feet wide. Use caution as some species are invasive, dropping their seeds and sprouting up like weeds. Choose the native stranger fig (Ficus aurea) as a sound choice for a fast-growing shade tree, as it is more resilient to tropical storm stresses. It matures 40 to 60 feet tall and almost as wide.


Vegetation The subtropical climate and abundant summer moisture of southern Florida supports rich vegetation in the glades. There are 100 species of seed bearing plants in the park and 120 species of trees. Many plants in the Everglades are found nowhere else on earth.

One of the most significant plants in the ecology of the glades is the mangrove family. The Everglades contain the greatest mangrove forest in North America. One member of the family, the red mangrove, is seen below along the shores of West Lake. One of the red mangrove's critical functions is its role in stabilizing the shoreline with its roots.

The red mangrove is usually found along the shore. The water around the base of the trees is often stained brown, a side effect of the tannin contained in the green, waxy leaves which fall into the water gradually throughout the year. Red mangrove bark is used to tan leather.

The most distinct and recognizable feature of the red mangrove is its stilt-like root system. The tree is sometimes known as the "walking mangrove" as the roots resemble legs in the water. The red mangrove also reproduces by dropping "propagules" which can take root and start a new tree.

This closeup of the the mangrove "legs" shows just how tangled the mangrove forest can become and why it is called a "mangle." The mangrove begins to grow these "prop" roots after a couple of years. Although the roots themselves may only penetrate a few inches into the in the soft mud in which it usually grows they hold the tree upright and keep it steady in hurricane winds which it eventually faces.

In addition to its role building and anchoring land, the red mangrove is also crucial to the Everglades ecosystem as a nursery for crustaceans and invertebrates. Mangrove swamps are among the most productive natural communities on the plant.

Hello all, I haven't been on palmtalk in awhile as I've been busy finishing up school and moving back down to south Florida.

I've been doing a lot of yard work at the new place which already had a substantial native garden which the owner wanted me to help refurbish. In researching native plants I came across several palms which are on Broward County considers to be harmful invasives. These include:

While certainly "non-native," most of these species simply blend in to existing habitat (making it look nicer IMO, esp with ptychosperma) and definitely don't deserve to be on the same list as casuarina, schinus, and melaleuca which form monotypic stands and displace all other vegation.

In fact, the only time I've ever heard of a palm being harmful to any natural habitat was on lignum vitae key, where the ranger told me the remnants of an old coconut plantation on the island's interior are preventing regeneration of the natural forest by covering the ground with dead fronds.

My point is, are these palms really harmful? Should growers in Florida really not plant them as is recommended? Thoughts?

Good question. I'm out in the swamps and wilds of Florida all the time. I've only seen a few wild queens and caryotas. I've yet to see a wild Ptychosperma. I see reclinatas everywhere though.

With intensely hot and humid summers, a fast-growing shade tree in Florida is a welcome landscape asset. Winter frosts are rare in southernmost counties, so more tropical species can be utilized. In the Panhandle and Central Florida, focus on trees that handle cold as low as 15 to 20 degrees F before planting in your landscape. A deciduous tree allows winter sun to penetrate, while an evergreen shades the ground year round. Always avoid weedy, ecologically-invasive tree species.

Native to northern Florida, the sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) displays pointy-lobed, maple-like leaves that turn shades of red, orange and yellow in November. It reaches maturity at 60 to 80 feet. Choose a fruitless variety like 'Rotundifolia' so you don't have to step on or mow over the spiky seed balls in your lawn. This tree grows well all over the state except in areas more southerly than Tampa or Melbourne.

The American plane tree, growing to 80 feet tall, is more often called the sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) while the London plane tree (Platanus x acerifolia) is a hybrid between American and European species and matures 80 to 90 feet tall. Use either tree to be a large lawn shade tree or street tree in northern and central Florida counties no further south than roughly Orlando. The hot summers and sandy soils often cause plane tree leaves to prematurely brown by August or September. Leaves are large and drop away naturally in October.

In tropical southern Florida, the royal poinciana, or flamboyant (Delonix regia), grows quickly and also provides showy flower displays in May and June. Although fast growing, it has many surface roots and therefore is not good around driveways and sidewalks, and it can be difficult to maintain both turf grass or shady garden plants under its boughs. The feathery leaves drop away in winter with the dry season and cool weather. Grow it no farther north than Lake Okeechobee unless along the coast. Typically it reaches 30 feet tall, but extremely old trees can be 40 to 50 feet in height.

Perhaps the best crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) for use as a shade tree is 'Natchez.' Its wide, umbrella-like canopy is filled with white flowers in early summer, and it has flaky cinnamon-colored bark. It can grow as much as 3 or 4 feet a year if soils are fertile and ample moisture is provided during the growing season. The 'Natchez' crape myrtle matures to 25 to 30 feet tall.

In southern Florida, massive tropical fig trees (Ficus spp.) provide dense year-round shade in parks and along streets. While much too large in scale for most residential properties, they can be nice at golf courses or parks with mature heights of 50 to 80 feet and up to 100 feet wide. Use caution as some species are invasive, dropping their seeds and sprouting up like weeds. Choose the native stranger fig (Ficus aurea) as a sound choice for a fast-growing shade tree, as it is more resilient to tropical storm stresses. It matures 40 to 60 feet tall and almost as wide.



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