Booker T. Washington - Wikipedia

Booker T. Washington - Educator, Civil Rights Activist.



Booker T. Washington: Great American Educator (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) (Graphic Library: Graphic Biographies)

Booker T. Washington , in full Booker Taliaferro Washington , (born April 5, 1856, Franklin county, Virginia , U.S.—died November 14, 1915, Tuskegee , Alabama .), educator and reformer, first president and principal developer of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (now Tuskegee University ), and the most influential spokesman for black Americans between 1895 and 1915.

From 1895 until his death in 1915, Booker T. Washington, a former slave who had built Tuskegee Institute in Alabama into a major centre of industrial training for African American youths, was the country’s dominant black leader. In a speech made in…

He was born in a slave hut but, after emancipation, moved with his family to Malden, West Virginia . Dire poverty ruled out regular schooling; at age nine he began working, first in a salt furnace and later in a coal mine. Determined to get an education , he enrolled at the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) in Virginia (1872), working as a janitor to help pay expenses. He graduated in 1875 and returned to Malden, where for two years he taught children in a day school and adults at night. Following studies at Wayland Seminary, Washington, D.C. (1878–79), he joined the staff of Hampton.

In 1881 Washington was selected to head a newly established normal school for African Americans at Tuskegee, an institution with two small converted buildings, no equipment, and very little money. Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute became a monument to his life’s work. At his death 34 years later, it had more than 100 well-equipped buildings, some 1,500 students, a faculty of nearly 200 teaching 38 trades and professions, and an endowment of approximately $2 million.

In all things that are purely social we can be separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.

Most blacks felt comfortable with Washington’s approach, however, and his influence among whites was such that he became an unofficial arbiter determining which black individuals and institutions were deemed worthy to benefit from government patronage and white philanthropic support. He went on to receive honorary degrees from Harvard University (1896) and Dartmouth College (1901). Among his dozen books is his autobiography, Up from Slavery (1901), translated into many languages.

Booker Taliaferro Washington ( April 5 , 1856 – November 14 , 1915 ) was an American political leader, educator and author of African ancestry, most famous for his tenure as President of Tuskegee University (1880–1915).

About the Author: Warren Hierl taught Advanced Placement U.S. History for twenty-eight years. He has conducted 250+ AP US History workshops for teachers. He was a member of the committee that wrote the original Advanced Placement Social Studies Vertical Teams Guide and the Advanced Placement U.S. History Teachers Guide . He has been a reader, a table leader, and, for the past eight years, the question leader on the DBQ at the AP U.S. History reading.

Born a slave in 1856, Booker T. Washington rose to prominence during the later eighteenth and early nineteenth century as a leader in the African-American civil rights movement.  In the extremely segregated south of the 1880s and 1890s, Washington was most famous for founding Tuskegee Institute and for what came to be known as the “Atlanta Compromise”.  The emergence of diverse opinions within the African-American community on how to proceed toward equality and the elimination of Jim Crow laws that mandated a segregated society was just as important.  Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois were the key players in this debate over the best method to obtain equality.

His experience led him to believe that the best way to achieve equality for African-Americans was through vocational training.

In 1881 Washington helped to establish Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and also helped expand its mission from a “normal school” (teacher’s college) to a full vocational college.  Tuskegee became a highly recognized institution and gained national attention (as did Washington).  He was the first African-American invited to the White House, both by Teddy Roosevelt and William Howard Taft who sought his advice on racial matters.  With the election of Woodrow Wilson in 1912, Washington’s influence in politics waned as Wilson was not interested in improving race relations.

In the south of the late nineteenth century, Washington knew that pushing too hard for equality could result in physical violence, including lynching.

His theory was that as blacks made economic advancement, they would become an indispensable element of southern society, and then social and political equality would naturally follow.

Booker T. Washington , in full Booker Taliaferro Washington , (born April 5, 1856, Franklin county, Virginia , U.S.—died November 14, 1915, Tuskegee , Alabama .), educator and reformer, first president and principal developer of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (now Tuskegee University ), and the most influential spokesman for black Americans between 1895 and 1915.

From 1895 until his death in 1915, Booker T. Washington, a former slave who had built Tuskegee Institute in Alabama into a major centre of industrial training for African American youths, was the country’s dominant black leader. In a speech made in…

He was born in a slave hut but, after emancipation, moved with his family to Malden, West Virginia . Dire poverty ruled out regular schooling; at age nine he began working, first in a salt furnace and later in a coal mine. Determined to get an education , he enrolled at the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) in Virginia (1872), working as a janitor to help pay expenses. He graduated in 1875 and returned to Malden, where for two years he taught children in a day school and adults at night. Following studies at Wayland Seminary, Washington, D.C. (1878–79), he joined the staff of Hampton.

In 1881 Washington was selected to head a newly established normal school for African Americans at Tuskegee, an institution with two small converted buildings, no equipment, and very little money. Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute became a monument to his life’s work. At his death 34 years later, it had more than 100 well-equipped buildings, some 1,500 students, a faculty of nearly 200 teaching 38 trades and professions, and an endowment of approximately $2 million.

In all things that are purely social we can be separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.

Most blacks felt comfortable with Washington’s approach, however, and his influence among whites was such that he became an unofficial arbiter determining which black individuals and institutions were deemed worthy to benefit from government patronage and white philanthropic support. He went on to receive honorary degrees from Harvard University (1896) and Dartmouth College (1901). Among his dozen books is his autobiography, Up from Slavery (1901), translated into many languages.

Booker T. Washington , in full Booker Taliaferro Washington , (born April 5, 1856, Franklin county, Virginia , U.S.—died November 14, 1915, Tuskegee , Alabama .), educator and reformer, first president and principal developer of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (now Tuskegee University ), and the most influential spokesman for black Americans between 1895 and 1915.

From 1895 until his death in 1915, Booker T. Washington, a former slave who had built Tuskegee Institute in Alabama into a major centre of industrial training for African American youths, was the country’s dominant black leader. In a speech made in…

He was born in a slave hut but, after emancipation, moved with his family to Malden, West Virginia . Dire poverty ruled out regular schooling; at age nine he began working, first in a salt furnace and later in a coal mine. Determined to get an education , he enrolled at the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) in Virginia (1872), working as a janitor to help pay expenses. He graduated in 1875 and returned to Malden, where for two years he taught children in a day school and adults at night. Following studies at Wayland Seminary, Washington, D.C. (1878–79), he joined the staff of Hampton.

In 1881 Washington was selected to head a newly established normal school for African Americans at Tuskegee, an institution with two small converted buildings, no equipment, and very little money. Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute became a monument to his life’s work. At his death 34 years later, it had more than 100 well-equipped buildings, some 1,500 students, a faculty of nearly 200 teaching 38 trades and professions, and an endowment of approximately $2 million.

In all things that are purely social we can be separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.

Most blacks felt comfortable with Washington’s approach, however, and his influence among whites was such that he became an unofficial arbiter determining which black individuals and institutions were deemed worthy to benefit from government patronage and white philanthropic support. He went on to receive honorary degrees from Harvard University (1896) and Dartmouth College (1901). Among his dozen books is his autobiography, Up from Slavery (1901), translated into many languages.

Booker Taliaferro Washington ( April 5 , 1856 – November 14 , 1915 ) was an American political leader, educator and author of African ancestry, most famous for his tenure as President of Tuskegee University (1880–1915).

Booker T. Washington , in full Booker Taliaferro Washington , (born April 5, 1856, Franklin county, Virginia , U.S.—died November 14, 1915, Tuskegee , Alabama .), educator and reformer, first president and principal developer of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (now Tuskegee University ), and the most influential spokesman for black Americans between 1895 and 1915.

From 1895 until his death in 1915, Booker T. Washington, a former slave who had built Tuskegee Institute in Alabama into a major centre of industrial training for African American youths, was the country’s dominant black leader. In a speech made in…

He was born in a slave hut but, after emancipation, moved with his family to Malden, West Virginia . Dire poverty ruled out regular schooling; at age nine he began working, first in a salt furnace and later in a coal mine. Determined to get an education , he enrolled at the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) in Virginia (1872), working as a janitor to help pay expenses. He graduated in 1875 and returned to Malden, where for two years he taught children in a day school and adults at night. Following studies at Wayland Seminary, Washington, D.C. (1878–79), he joined the staff of Hampton.

In 1881 Washington was selected to head a newly established normal school for African Americans at Tuskegee, an institution with two small converted buildings, no equipment, and very little money. Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute became a monument to his life’s work. At his death 34 years later, it had more than 100 well-equipped buildings, some 1,500 students, a faculty of nearly 200 teaching 38 trades and professions, and an endowment of approximately $2 million.

In all things that are purely social we can be separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.

Most blacks felt comfortable with Washington’s approach, however, and his influence among whites was such that he became an unofficial arbiter determining which black individuals and institutions were deemed worthy to benefit from government patronage and white philanthropic support. He went on to receive honorary degrees from Harvard University (1896) and Dartmouth College (1901). Among his dozen books is his autobiography, Up from Slavery (1901), translated into many languages.

Booker Taliaferro Washington ( April 5 , 1856 – November 14 , 1915 ) was an American political leader, educator and author of African ancestry, most famous for his tenure as President of Tuskegee University (1880–1915).

About the Author: Warren Hierl taught Advanced Placement U.S. History for twenty-eight years. He has conducted 250+ AP US History workshops for teachers. He was a member of the committee that wrote the original Advanced Placement Social Studies Vertical Teams Guide and the Advanced Placement U.S. History Teachers Guide . He has been a reader, a table leader, and, for the past eight years, the question leader on the DBQ at the AP U.S. History reading.

Born a slave in 1856, Booker T. Washington rose to prominence during the later eighteenth and early nineteenth century as a leader in the African-American civil rights movement.  In the extremely segregated south of the 1880s and 1890s, Washington was most famous for founding Tuskegee Institute and for what came to be known as the “Atlanta Compromise”.  The emergence of diverse opinions within the African-American community on how to proceed toward equality and the elimination of Jim Crow laws that mandated a segregated society was just as important.  Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois were the key players in this debate over the best method to obtain equality.

His experience led him to believe that the best way to achieve equality for African-Americans was through vocational training.

In 1881 Washington helped to establish Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and also helped expand its mission from a “normal school” (teacher’s college) to a full vocational college.  Tuskegee became a highly recognized institution and gained national attention (as did Washington).  He was the first African-American invited to the White House, both by Teddy Roosevelt and William Howard Taft who sought his advice on racial matters.  With the election of Woodrow Wilson in 1912, Washington’s influence in politics waned as Wilson was not interested in improving race relations.

In the south of the late nineteenth century, Washington knew that pushing too hard for equality could result in physical violence, including lynching.

His theory was that as blacks made economic advancement, they would become an indispensable element of southern society, and then social and political equality would naturally follow.

Terms of Use | Schoolwires Privacy Policy (Updated) | Copyright Dallas Independent School District, All Rights Reserved



51LgbE-1XKL