Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) - IMDb

Captain America: The First Avenger - Wikipedia



Captain America: The Chosen


Captain America: The First Avenger is a 2011 superhero film based on the Marvel comics superhero Captain America and the fifth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe . It is directed by Joe Johnston and stars Chris Evans as Steve Rogers , Hugo Weaving as Red Skull , Hayley Atwell as Rogers' love interest Peggy Carter and Sebastian Stan as Bucky Barnes . The film focus on the origins of Rogers and his fight against the Red Skull and HYDRA during World War II. The film is the final prelude to the crossover film The Avengers .

In a secret lab behind a Brooklyn antique store, Erskine and others gather with Senator Brandt and U.S. State Department employee Fred Clemson as Rogers is given micro-injections of serum and then doused with what Erskine calls "vita-rays". Rogers emerges from a chamber tall and muscular — and his abilities are put to the test immediately when Clemson is exposed as assassin Heinz Kruger who kills Erskine. Rogers pursues Kruger in his car, but the spy flees to his submarine after Carter kills the driver. Rogers captures Kruger, but the spy commits suicide with a cyanide capsule.

To destroy HYDRA's bases, Rogers recruits a team consisting of Barnes, Timothy "Dum Dum" Dugan , and Gabe Jones , Jim Morita , James Falsworth , and Jacques Dernier . Adopting a circular shield made of a substance Stark calls vibranium, which absorbs vibrations, Rogers and his squad take out all but one base. Finally, Rogers and Barnes zip line onto a train transporting Zola; during the ensuing battle, Barnes seemingly falls to his death in a gorge.

Rogers awakens in a New York City hospital room with a Brooklyn Dodgers game playing on the radio. When he realizes the broadcast is from a game he attended before the war, he is surrounded by security guards. Rogers flees the building and finds himself in modern day Times Square. S.H.I.E.L.D. leader Nick Fury arrives on the scene and tells Rogers that he has been asleep for nearly 70 years. Shocked by this, Rogers' only response is that he had a date with Carter.

In a post-credits scene, Rogers angrily hits a punching bag before being approached by Fury, who assigns him to save the world.

When the Avengers first assembled four years ago, it felt like a grand culmination, the ultimate Marvel superhero event: its Big Four characters united (well, eventually) against a colossal planetary threat. Since then, the studio’s ever-expanding Cinematic Universe has delivered sequels of varying quality and introduced new heroes in stand-alone movies (well, as close to stand-alone as Marvel can ever get), but it’s never quite matched the ensemble-balancing finesse and Earth-quaking action scale of Joss Whedon ’s initial assembling. Certainly not in his clunkier, team-gathering follow up, Age Of Ultron . Not until now.

Captain America: Civil War is the best Marvel Studios movie yet. There, we said it. First, and most importantly, it does what the best Marvel films do: juggling multiple characters so each is allowed its moment in a story that pushes forward the series’ overall continuity, while also forming and concluding its own cogent plot. So here Scarlet Witch ( Elisabeth Olsen ) wrestles with the consequences of her immense power; Vision ( Paul Bettany ) starts getting to grips with being ‘human’; Black Widow ( Scarlett Johansson ) finds herself torn when the battle line is drawn; and supposed retiree Hawkeye ( Jeremy Renner ) just can’t stay out of the fight.

Then there are the new recruits: Black Panther ( Chadwick Boseman , playing it gravelly and furrow-browed), nimble protector of a secretive African nation who has his own beef with Bucky; and a quippy kid from Queens ( Tom Holland ) who crawls up walls in a red-and-blue outfit and can shoot webs at people. His introduction to the action is resoundingly joyous, the reboot the character truly deserves. (“I don’t know if you’ve been in a fight before,” he’s told by one opponent, “but there’s not usually this much talk.”) Even Paul Rudd ’s Ant-Man receives more than a tokenistic ‘hey it’s him!’ cameo, and in spectacle terms at least, is given the film’s biggest scene.

It’s bold of writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely to place their title hero in the most obviously dubious position. If the Avengers don’t answer to the UN, who should they answer to? And Steve’s defence of Bucky is questionable: he may be his childhood friend, but now he’s a lethal, robot-armed killing machine forever in danger of being reactivated. It’s fair enough that he should be brought to heel, right? Then again, there are flaws in Tony’s arguments, too, especially the problematic evidence on which he rests them. Who the audience should agree with is hardly a clear-cut matter.

Who needs a villain when you have Steve and Tony? Both protagonists. Both antagonists. And drawing other power-people to their cause in surprising ways. The clashes go far beyond the set-up squabbles of Avengers Assemble . Or even that other big 2016 superhero showdown. Forget Batman v Superman . Here you get Ant-Man v Spider-Man , Hawkeye v Black Widow , Scarlet Witch v Vision , The Winter Soldier v Black Panther and (well, duh) Captain America v Iron Man , all rolled into one. And that is what you call the ultimate Marvel superhero event.


Captain America: The First Avenger is a 2011 superhero film based on the Marvel comics superhero Captain America and the fifth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe . It is directed by Joe Johnston and stars Chris Evans as Steve Rogers , Hugo Weaving as Red Skull , Hayley Atwell as Rogers' love interest Peggy Carter and Sebastian Stan as Bucky Barnes . The film focus on the origins of Rogers and his fight against the Red Skull and HYDRA during World War II. The film is the final prelude to the crossover film The Avengers .

In a secret lab behind a Brooklyn antique store, Erskine and others gather with Senator Brandt and U.S. State Department employee Fred Clemson as Rogers is given micro-injections of serum and then doused with what Erskine calls "vita-rays". Rogers emerges from a chamber tall and muscular — and his abilities are put to the test immediately when Clemson is exposed as assassin Heinz Kruger who kills Erskine. Rogers pursues Kruger in his car, but the spy flees to his submarine after Carter kills the driver. Rogers captures Kruger, but the spy commits suicide with a cyanide capsule.

To destroy HYDRA's bases, Rogers recruits a team consisting of Barnes, Timothy "Dum Dum" Dugan , and Gabe Jones , Jim Morita , James Falsworth , and Jacques Dernier . Adopting a circular shield made of a substance Stark calls vibranium, which absorbs vibrations, Rogers and his squad take out all but one base. Finally, Rogers and Barnes zip line onto a train transporting Zola; during the ensuing battle, Barnes seemingly falls to his death in a gorge.

Rogers awakens in a New York City hospital room with a Brooklyn Dodgers game playing on the radio. When he realizes the broadcast is from a game he attended before the war, he is surrounded by security guards. Rogers flees the building and finds himself in modern day Times Square. S.H.I.E.L.D. leader Nick Fury arrives on the scene and tells Rogers that he has been asleep for nearly 70 years. Shocked by this, Rogers' only response is that he had a date with Carter.

In a post-credits scene, Rogers angrily hits a punching bag before being approached by Fury, who assigns him to save the world.


Captain America: The First Avenger is a 2011 superhero film based on the Marvel comics superhero Captain America and the fifth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe . It is directed by Joe Johnston and stars Chris Evans as Steve Rogers , Hugo Weaving as Red Skull , Hayley Atwell as Rogers' love interest Peggy Carter and Sebastian Stan as Bucky Barnes . The film focus on the origins of Rogers and his fight against the Red Skull and HYDRA during World War II. The film is the final prelude to the crossover film The Avengers .

In a secret lab behind a Brooklyn antique store, Erskine and others gather with Senator Brandt and U.S. State Department employee Fred Clemson as Rogers is given micro-injections of serum and then doused with what Erskine calls "vita-rays". Rogers emerges from a chamber tall and muscular — and his abilities are put to the test immediately when Clemson is exposed as assassin Heinz Kruger who kills Erskine. Rogers pursues Kruger in his car, but the spy flees to his submarine after Carter kills the driver. Rogers captures Kruger, but the spy commits suicide with a cyanide capsule.

To destroy HYDRA's bases, Rogers recruits a team consisting of Barnes, Timothy "Dum Dum" Dugan , and Gabe Jones , Jim Morita , James Falsworth , and Jacques Dernier . Adopting a circular shield made of a substance Stark calls vibranium, which absorbs vibrations, Rogers and his squad take out all but one base. Finally, Rogers and Barnes zip line onto a train transporting Zola; during the ensuing battle, Barnes seemingly falls to his death in a gorge.

Rogers awakens in a New York City hospital room with a Brooklyn Dodgers game playing on the radio. When he realizes the broadcast is from a game he attended before the war, he is surrounded by security guards. Rogers flees the building and finds himself in modern day Times Square. S.H.I.E.L.D. leader Nick Fury arrives on the scene and tells Rogers that he has been asleep for nearly 70 years. Shocked by this, Rogers' only response is that he had a date with Carter.

In a post-credits scene, Rogers angrily hits a punching bag before being approached by Fury, who assigns him to save the world.

When the Avengers first assembled four years ago, it felt like a grand culmination, the ultimate Marvel superhero event: its Big Four characters united (well, eventually) against a colossal planetary threat. Since then, the studio’s ever-expanding Cinematic Universe has delivered sequels of varying quality and introduced new heroes in stand-alone movies (well, as close to stand-alone as Marvel can ever get), but it’s never quite matched the ensemble-balancing finesse and Earth-quaking action scale of Joss Whedon ’s initial assembling. Certainly not in his clunkier, team-gathering follow up, Age Of Ultron . Not until now.

Captain America: Civil War is the best Marvel Studios movie yet. There, we said it. First, and most importantly, it does what the best Marvel films do: juggling multiple characters so each is allowed its moment in a story that pushes forward the series’ overall continuity, while also forming and concluding its own cogent plot. So here Scarlet Witch ( Elisabeth Olsen ) wrestles with the consequences of her immense power; Vision ( Paul Bettany ) starts getting to grips with being ‘human’; Black Widow ( Scarlett Johansson ) finds herself torn when the battle line is drawn; and supposed retiree Hawkeye ( Jeremy Renner ) just can’t stay out of the fight.

Then there are the new recruits: Black Panther ( Chadwick Boseman , playing it gravelly and furrow-browed), nimble protector of a secretive African nation who has his own beef with Bucky; and a quippy kid from Queens ( Tom Holland ) who crawls up walls in a red-and-blue outfit and can shoot webs at people. His introduction to the action is resoundingly joyous, the reboot the character truly deserves. (“I don’t know if you’ve been in a fight before,” he’s told by one opponent, “but there’s not usually this much talk.”) Even Paul Rudd ’s Ant-Man receives more than a tokenistic ‘hey it’s him!’ cameo, and in spectacle terms at least, is given the film’s biggest scene.

It’s bold of writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely to place their title hero in the most obviously dubious position. If the Avengers don’t answer to the UN, who should they answer to? And Steve’s defence of Bucky is questionable: he may be his childhood friend, but now he’s a lethal, robot-armed killing machine forever in danger of being reactivated. It’s fair enough that he should be brought to heel, right? Then again, there are flaws in Tony’s arguments, too, especially the problematic evidence on which he rests them. Who the audience should agree with is hardly a clear-cut matter.

Who needs a villain when you have Steve and Tony? Both protagonists. Both antagonists. And drawing other power-people to their cause in surprising ways. The clashes go far beyond the set-up squabbles of Avengers Assemble . Or even that other big 2016 superhero showdown. Forget Batman v Superman . Here you get Ant-Man v Spider-Man , Hawkeye v Black Widow , Scarlet Witch v Vision , The Winter Soldier v Black Panther and (well, duh) Captain America v Iron Man , all rolled into one. And that is what you call the ultimate Marvel superhero event.

342 Shares Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment Though Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) may not be suiting up as Nomad in Avengers: Infinity War , Steve will at least possess the “spirit” of Nomad. Nomad was an identity used by the character at a time where he was disillusioned with the state of the country. The storyline was crafted as a response to the Watergate scandal.

Avengers: Infinity War picks up where Captain America: Civil War left off, with the Avengers split over the division created by the Sokovia Accords. Captain America and Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) led separate teams of heroes into battle against each other after Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) was framed for killing Black Panther’s father. Following the battle, Captain America, Falcon (Anthony Mackie), Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen), Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), Ant-Man (Paul Rudd), and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) became fugitives.

In a conversation with Fantasy Focus Football , Avengers: Infinity War director Joe Russo talks about Captain America and the current direction o f the character. Russo commented on the rumors that Steve would become Nomad , and instead of confirming them, Russo says Avengers: Infinity War ‘s Steve Rogers is “ the spirit of that character .” Russo adds that their plan for Captain America was to “ deconstruct ” him in order to take him in a new direction:

Obviously you can’t deal with a character called Captain America without dealing with the thematics behind that, so we wanted a relevancy to it and we wanted to put him in a position where he was questioning the chain of command.

Russo’s vision for Captain America in the upcoming film matches up with what comic book writer Steve Englehart created during his run on the Captain America title in the 1970s. Englehart’s “Secret Empire” took the Sentinel of Liberty to a dark place by having him realize that his enemy was the President of the United States. The story, and Captain America’s reaction to it, mirrored the atmosphere of the country, which was still reeling from the Watergate scandal.

Steve Rogers was so disillusioned at the end of “Secret Empire” that he chose to abandon the “Captain America” mantle. Steve felt that the country no longer stood for the same ideals that he had tried to represent. After being convinced by Hawkeye that he didn’t have to be Captain America to be a superhero, Steve became Nomad, “The Man Without a Country.”


Captain America: The First Avenger is a 2011 superhero film based on the Marvel comics superhero Captain America and the fifth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe . It is directed by Joe Johnston and stars Chris Evans as Steve Rogers , Hugo Weaving as Red Skull , Hayley Atwell as Rogers' love interest Peggy Carter and Sebastian Stan as Bucky Barnes . The film focus on the origins of Rogers and his fight against the Red Skull and HYDRA during World War II. The film is the final prelude to the crossover film The Avengers .

In a secret lab behind a Brooklyn antique store, Erskine and others gather with Senator Brandt and U.S. State Department employee Fred Clemson as Rogers is given micro-injections of serum and then doused with what Erskine calls "vita-rays". Rogers emerges from a chamber tall and muscular — and his abilities are put to the test immediately when Clemson is exposed as assassin Heinz Kruger who kills Erskine. Rogers pursues Kruger in his car, but the spy flees to his submarine after Carter kills the driver. Rogers captures Kruger, but the spy commits suicide with a cyanide capsule.

To destroy HYDRA's bases, Rogers recruits a team consisting of Barnes, Timothy "Dum Dum" Dugan , and Gabe Jones , Jim Morita , James Falsworth , and Jacques Dernier . Adopting a circular shield made of a substance Stark calls vibranium, which absorbs vibrations, Rogers and his squad take out all but one base. Finally, Rogers and Barnes zip line onto a train transporting Zola; during the ensuing battle, Barnes seemingly falls to his death in a gorge.

Rogers awakens in a New York City hospital room with a Brooklyn Dodgers game playing on the radio. When he realizes the broadcast is from a game he attended before the war, he is surrounded by security guards. Rogers flees the building and finds himself in modern day Times Square. S.H.I.E.L.D. leader Nick Fury arrives on the scene and tells Rogers that he has been asleep for nearly 70 years. Shocked by this, Rogers' only response is that he had a date with Carter.

In a post-credits scene, Rogers angrily hits a punching bag before being approached by Fury, who assigns him to save the world.

When the Avengers first assembled four years ago, it felt like a grand culmination, the ultimate Marvel superhero event: its Big Four characters united (well, eventually) against a colossal planetary threat. Since then, the studio’s ever-expanding Cinematic Universe has delivered sequels of varying quality and introduced new heroes in stand-alone movies (well, as close to stand-alone as Marvel can ever get), but it’s never quite matched the ensemble-balancing finesse and Earth-quaking action scale of Joss Whedon ’s initial assembling. Certainly not in his clunkier, team-gathering follow up, Age Of Ultron . Not until now.

Captain America: Civil War is the best Marvel Studios movie yet. There, we said it. First, and most importantly, it does what the best Marvel films do: juggling multiple characters so each is allowed its moment in a story that pushes forward the series’ overall continuity, while also forming and concluding its own cogent plot. So here Scarlet Witch ( Elisabeth Olsen ) wrestles with the consequences of her immense power; Vision ( Paul Bettany ) starts getting to grips with being ‘human’; Black Widow ( Scarlett Johansson ) finds herself torn when the battle line is drawn; and supposed retiree Hawkeye ( Jeremy Renner ) just can’t stay out of the fight.

Then there are the new recruits: Black Panther ( Chadwick Boseman , playing it gravelly and furrow-browed), nimble protector of a secretive African nation who has his own beef with Bucky; and a quippy kid from Queens ( Tom Holland ) who crawls up walls in a red-and-blue outfit and can shoot webs at people. His introduction to the action is resoundingly joyous, the reboot the character truly deserves. (“I don’t know if you’ve been in a fight before,” he’s told by one opponent, “but there’s not usually this much talk.”) Even Paul Rudd ’s Ant-Man receives more than a tokenistic ‘hey it’s him!’ cameo, and in spectacle terms at least, is given the film’s biggest scene.

It’s bold of writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely to place their title hero in the most obviously dubious position. If the Avengers don’t answer to the UN, who should they answer to? And Steve’s defence of Bucky is questionable: he may be his childhood friend, but now he’s a lethal, robot-armed killing machine forever in danger of being reactivated. It’s fair enough that he should be brought to heel, right? Then again, there are flaws in Tony’s arguments, too, especially the problematic evidence on which he rests them. Who the audience should agree with is hardly a clear-cut matter.

Who needs a villain when you have Steve and Tony? Both protagonists. Both antagonists. And drawing other power-people to their cause in surprising ways. The clashes go far beyond the set-up squabbles of Avengers Assemble . Or even that other big 2016 superhero showdown. Forget Batman v Superman . Here you get Ant-Man v Spider-Man , Hawkeye v Black Widow , Scarlet Witch v Vision , The Winter Soldier v Black Panther and (well, duh) Captain America v Iron Man , all rolled into one. And that is what you call the ultimate Marvel superhero event.

342 Shares Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment Though Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) may not be suiting up as Nomad in Avengers: Infinity War , Steve will at least possess the “spirit” of Nomad. Nomad was an identity used by the character at a time where he was disillusioned with the state of the country. The storyline was crafted as a response to the Watergate scandal.

Avengers: Infinity War picks up where Captain America: Civil War left off, with the Avengers split over the division created by the Sokovia Accords. Captain America and Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) led separate teams of heroes into battle against each other after Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) was framed for killing Black Panther’s father. Following the battle, Captain America, Falcon (Anthony Mackie), Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen), Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), Ant-Man (Paul Rudd), and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) became fugitives.

In a conversation with Fantasy Focus Football , Avengers: Infinity War director Joe Russo talks about Captain America and the current direction o f the character. Russo commented on the rumors that Steve would become Nomad , and instead of confirming them, Russo says Avengers: Infinity War ‘s Steve Rogers is “ the spirit of that character .” Russo adds that their plan for Captain America was to “ deconstruct ” him in order to take him in a new direction:

Obviously you can’t deal with a character called Captain America without dealing with the thematics behind that, so we wanted a relevancy to it and we wanted to put him in a position where he was questioning the chain of command.

Russo’s vision for Captain America in the upcoming film matches up with what comic book writer Steve Englehart created during his run on the Captain America title in the 1970s. Englehart’s “Secret Empire” took the Sentinel of Liberty to a dark place by having him realize that his enemy was the President of the United States. The story, and Captain America’s reaction to it, mirrored the atmosphere of the country, which was still reeling from the Watergate scandal.

Steve Rogers was so disillusioned at the end of “Secret Empire” that he chose to abandon the “Captain America” mantle. Steve felt that the country no longer stood for the same ideals that he had tried to represent. After being convinced by Hawkeye that he didn’t have to be Captain America to be a superhero, Steve became Nomad, “The Man Without a Country.”

For information on the Captain America that substituted for Steve Rogers when the latter apparently "died" in 2007 see the Bucky Barnes character page.

Captain America was created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby as a response to the booming popularity of patriotically-themed super heroes in the 1940's. Though it was rare for any character, let alone a new one, to get a self-named title in those days, he debuted in Captain America Comics #1 (March,1941). He was depicted fighting Adolph Hitler himself on the cover even though the United States had not yet entered World War II and wouldn't for another 9 months. Debuting along with Captain America in this comic was his teenage partner Bucky, and his arch-enemy the Red Skull . This issue sold nearly one million copies and Captain America soon became Marvel's best-selling character.

"Cap" (the nickname he came to affectionately be called) spent World War II punching, kicking and defeating Nazis, Japanese, and other Axis members. In addition to help from Bucky, he battled the Axis forces alongside other Marvel (Timely) stalwarts: the Sub-Mariner and the Human Torch . Simon and Kirby did ten issues before leaving Timely to work for DC . When the war eventually ended, superheroes fell out of favor and comics sales declined. Captain America Comics were printed up to issue #75 , but by then it had become a horror book and soon ended.

His life changed, though, when the Axis forces sweep across Europe starting World War II. Seeing their atrocities on newsreels, Rogers becomes convinced they need to be fought and that the European war would soon pull America into the conflict, inspiring him to enlist in the U.S. armed forces to fight against the Axis forces.

After a rigorous process to choose a suitable candidate, Steve Rogers was chosen to be the first man whom the Super Soldier Serum would be administered to. It was Dr. Abraham Erskine who had developed the process, and it was he who administered it to Rogers. Rogers was injected with the Super Soldier Serum and was then bathed in Vita-Rays which activated and stabilized the serum's chemicals in his system.

While there he continued his extensive training and was deployed several times both domestically and abroad on covert missions. When on base as private, Steve purposely developed a persona and reputation as a clumsy soon-to-be soldier. It was also during this period that he meets Bucky Barnes - a young teenager who accidentally found out that Steve Rogers was secretly Captain America. With the U.S. Federal Governments permission, Steve trains Bucky and makes him his sidekick. Captain America and Bucky became a formidable fighting duo during World War II.