American Pool Checkers - Wikipedia

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American Checker Player, Vol. 1: March 15th, 1875 (Classic Reprint)

In American English, check is the standard spelling of the noun  referring to a written order for a bank to pay a specified amount from deposited funds. Outside the U.S., the word is spelled cheque . But cheque is confined to this very narrow banking-related sense. All varieties of English use check for the many non-banking-related senses of the word—including (1) a restraint , (2) a pattern of small squares , (3) to halt , and (3) to inspect for accuracy or correctness.

In American English, the word for the piece of paper representing a specified amount of money is check —for example:

If an organisation is open and keen to invite a client to engage beyond their cheque book, a relationship of trust is developed. [ Guardian ]

And throughout the English-speaking world, check is used for all senses of the word unrelated to banking—for example:

On Monday an 88-year-old Chifley resident was targeted by a man claiming he was there to check the sewerage. [ The Canberra Times ]

Oh look, “Check her out at the bank. Bye email you later.”
*Later…*
“When will you pay my money?”

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In American English, check is the standard spelling of the noun  referring to a written order for a bank to pay a specified amount from deposited funds. Outside the U.S., the word is spelled cheque . But cheque is confined to this very narrow banking-related sense. All varieties of English use check for the many non-banking-related senses of the word—including (1) a restraint , (2) a pattern of small squares , (3) to halt , and (3) to inspect for accuracy or correctness.

In American English, the word for the piece of paper representing a specified amount of money is check —for example:

If an organisation is open and keen to invite a client to engage beyond their cheque book, a relationship of trust is developed. [ Guardian ]

And throughout the English-speaking world, check is used for all senses of the word unrelated to banking—for example:

On Monday an 88-year-old Chifley resident was targeted by a man claiming he was there to check the sewerage. [ The Canberra Times ]

Oh look, “Check her out at the bank. Bye email you later.”
*Later…*
“When will you pay my money?”



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