Amazing Spider-Man Annual Vol 1 - Marvel Database

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual (Volume) - Comic Vine



Amazing Spider-Man Annual (1964 series) #16

In the grand, modern tradition of Amazing Spider-Man annuals actually mattering, issue #36 provides quite a punch. It's also one of those books that's completely frustrating to review because so much of the gravity relies on the key plot twist.

By the end of ASM Annual #36, you'll have felt like something huge was accomplished. If you get jazzed by figuring out what's canon and what isn't post-"Brand New Day," you're in luck because this book brings Spider-Man back in contact with a very famous (some might say "infamous") period of time in his life, and poses some intriguing questions about it. That's all good for the future of the title. But as an issue itself, this Annual is all that great on its own terms.

For one, the good stuff is a couple pages at the end. You could hypothetically skip the beginning and middle portions and come away with about as much enjoyment as those of us who've read the entire thing. What comes before that is May and Jay's sleepy engagement party, and an extended fight with new villain Velociraptor that only ever brushes against being humorous. It's all standard, by the numbers stuff, and I can't help but feel that it's padding before the big reveal at the end.

Pat Olliffe's artwork echos that somewhat. It's perfectly fine, he does what's required of him, and was never at a loss regarding what was supposed to be happening in the story. But it never transcends competency. There are some pleasant panels of Spidey in action, and most of the time Velociraptor comes across effectively. But overall it's not something that's going to set the world alight.

The bottom line is, this Annual falls into a category that's increasingly popular these days: it's a fair enough book created with the implicit purpose to set up other, more interesting stories down the road. And this sort of project can only be so successful as a standalone, no matter how many chuckle-worthy moments are peppered throughout.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Website design by Doug Roberts and John Rhett Thomas. All images on this site are copyright of Marvel Comics. This site is for reference purposes and promotion of the Masterworks line of books as well as Marvel Comics and their properties.

Note: Comics shown are for database purposes only. None of these comics are for sale. Valuations shown are indicative Near Mint Values . Dates shown are cover dates.

If you're confused by the current titles, then you might want to read our Current Title Summary which lists the current titles, and how they fit together.

If you can't find a comic at SpiderFan, please Mail Us . You might also want to try Peter Kroon's Spider-Man Covers Page , or one of the other Comics Databases referenced on our Links Page .

For further information about the contents and arrangement of this database, please read our database notes page. This contains information on the Inclusion Guidelines , the Variant Cover Guidelines , the Graphics Keys , the Appearance Levels , the Comic/Book Valuations , the Review Ratings , and the SMURF Codes .

Hosted by ComicBoards.Com . Page design and all text content (excluding direct quotes) © 2013 SpiderFan.Org.

This page is Un-Official. It is not associated with Marvel . It uses content copyright by Marvel, Without Permission . This material is used for the purposes of informed discussion, and is not intended to interfere with Marvel's right to use such material for their own commercial goals.

Many comic lovers dream of being able to write their own stories for their favorite superheroes. For Let’s Make a Deal co-hosts Wayne Brady and Jonathan Mangum, that dream has officially come true, with the pair co-writing a story for this year’s Amazing Spider-Man Annual , available for purchase today.

“On my checklist of ‘This is cool s— that would be awesome to do in your life,’ up at the top was definitely meeting Stan Lee, which I’ve gotten a chance to do and either being in a Marvel show or movie, or getting a chance to write a Marvel story,” says Brady, a lifelong comic fan.

“’What if Spider-Man lost his funny mojo? Where would he go? How would he get it back?” says Brady of what fans can expect from their story. “Spidey is used to making things up on the fly. So he goes to Jonathan and myself to maybe take that to the next level. 

With Brady and Mangum swinging into comics writing, EW spoke to the duo about their favorite heroes, their experiences writing a Spider-Man annual, and who they’d like to write next. 

JONATHAN MANGUM: Growing up [Spider-Man] would be one of the first ones you get exposed to. It’s Batman, Spider-Man, Superman, the trifecta of superheroes. Spiderman always had a sense of humor, which was always really cool to see. Batman could not tell a joke to save his damn life.

Everyone has something they want to see in a superhero story. What did you guys definitely want to write about when you first came on board?

In the grand, modern tradition of Amazing Spider-Man annuals actually mattering, issue #36 provides quite a punch. It's also one of those books that's completely frustrating to review because so much of the gravity relies on the key plot twist.

By the end of ASM Annual #36, you'll have felt like something huge was accomplished. If you get jazzed by figuring out what's canon and what isn't post-"Brand New Day," you're in luck because this book brings Spider-Man back in contact with a very famous (some might say "infamous") period of time in his life, and poses some intriguing questions about it. That's all good for the future of the title. But as an issue itself, this Annual is all that great on its own terms.

For one, the good stuff is a couple pages at the end. You could hypothetically skip the beginning and middle portions and come away with about as much enjoyment as those of us who've read the entire thing. What comes before that is May and Jay's sleepy engagement party, and an extended fight with new villain Velociraptor that only ever brushes against being humorous. It's all standard, by the numbers stuff, and I can't help but feel that it's padding before the big reveal at the end.

Pat Olliffe's artwork echos that somewhat. It's perfectly fine, he does what's required of him, and was never at a loss regarding what was supposed to be happening in the story. But it never transcends competency. There are some pleasant panels of Spidey in action, and most of the time Velociraptor comes across effectively. But overall it's not something that's going to set the world alight.

The bottom line is, this Annual falls into a category that's increasingly popular these days: it's a fair enough book created with the implicit purpose to set up other, more interesting stories down the road. And this sort of project can only be so successful as a standalone, no matter how many chuckle-worthy moments are peppered throughout.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Website design by Doug Roberts and John Rhett Thomas. All images on this site are copyright of Marvel Comics. This site is for reference purposes and promotion of the Masterworks line of books as well as Marvel Comics and their properties.

In the grand, modern tradition of Amazing Spider-Man annuals actually mattering, issue #36 provides quite a punch. It's also one of those books that's completely frustrating to review because so much of the gravity relies on the key plot twist.

By the end of ASM Annual #36, you'll have felt like something huge was accomplished. If you get jazzed by figuring out what's canon and what isn't post-"Brand New Day," you're in luck because this book brings Spider-Man back in contact with a very famous (some might say "infamous") period of time in his life, and poses some intriguing questions about it. That's all good for the future of the title. But as an issue itself, this Annual is all that great on its own terms.

For one, the good stuff is a couple pages at the end. You could hypothetically skip the beginning and middle portions and come away with about as much enjoyment as those of us who've read the entire thing. What comes before that is May and Jay's sleepy engagement party, and an extended fight with new villain Velociraptor that only ever brushes against being humorous. It's all standard, by the numbers stuff, and I can't help but feel that it's padding before the big reveal at the end.

Pat Olliffe's artwork echos that somewhat. It's perfectly fine, he does what's required of him, and was never at a loss regarding what was supposed to be happening in the story. But it never transcends competency. There are some pleasant panels of Spidey in action, and most of the time Velociraptor comes across effectively. But overall it's not something that's going to set the world alight.

The bottom line is, this Annual falls into a category that's increasingly popular these days: it's a fair enough book created with the implicit purpose to set up other, more interesting stories down the road. And this sort of project can only be so successful as a standalone, no matter how many chuckle-worthy moments are peppered throughout.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Website design by Doug Roberts and John Rhett Thomas. All images on this site are copyright of Marvel Comics. This site is for reference purposes and promotion of the Masterworks line of books as well as Marvel Comics and their properties.

Note: Comics shown are for database purposes only. None of these comics are for sale. Valuations shown are indicative Near Mint Values . Dates shown are cover dates.

If you're confused by the current titles, then you might want to read our Current Title Summary which lists the current titles, and how they fit together.

If you can't find a comic at SpiderFan, please Mail Us . You might also want to try Peter Kroon's Spider-Man Covers Page , or one of the other Comics Databases referenced on our Links Page .

For further information about the contents and arrangement of this database, please read our database notes page. This contains information on the Inclusion Guidelines , the Variant Cover Guidelines , the Graphics Keys , the Appearance Levels , the Comic/Book Valuations , the Review Ratings , and the SMURF Codes .

Hosted by ComicBoards.Com . Page design and all text content (excluding direct quotes) © 2013 SpiderFan.Org.

This page is Un-Official. It is not associated with Marvel . It uses content copyright by Marvel, Without Permission . This material is used for the purposes of informed discussion, and is not intended to interfere with Marvel's right to use such material for their own commercial goals.

In the grand, modern tradition of Amazing Spider-Man annuals actually mattering, issue #36 provides quite a punch. It's also one of those books that's completely frustrating to review because so much of the gravity relies on the key plot twist.

By the end of ASM Annual #36, you'll have felt like something huge was accomplished. If you get jazzed by figuring out what's canon and what isn't post-"Brand New Day," you're in luck because this book brings Spider-Man back in contact with a very famous (some might say "infamous") period of time in his life, and poses some intriguing questions about it. That's all good for the future of the title. But as an issue itself, this Annual is all that great on its own terms.

For one, the good stuff is a couple pages at the end. You could hypothetically skip the beginning and middle portions and come away with about as much enjoyment as those of us who've read the entire thing. What comes before that is May and Jay's sleepy engagement party, and an extended fight with new villain Velociraptor that only ever brushes against being humorous. It's all standard, by the numbers stuff, and I can't help but feel that it's padding before the big reveal at the end.

Pat Olliffe's artwork echos that somewhat. It's perfectly fine, he does what's required of him, and was never at a loss regarding what was supposed to be happening in the story. But it never transcends competency. There are some pleasant panels of Spidey in action, and most of the time Velociraptor comes across effectively. But overall it's not something that's going to set the world alight.

The bottom line is, this Annual falls into a category that's increasingly popular these days: it's a fair enough book created with the implicit purpose to set up other, more interesting stories down the road. And this sort of project can only be so successful as a standalone, no matter how many chuckle-worthy moments are peppered throughout.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.



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