Max Elto - Backyard Animals [OFFICIAL VIDEO] - YouTube

Animals in Your Backyard | Animal Bliss



Backyard Animal Video Safari

© 2018 AccuWeather, Inc. All Rights Reserved. AccuWeather.com is a registered trademark of AccuWeather, Inc. Terms of usage under which this service is provided Privacy Statement | Ad Choices

P-22, a mountain lion resident of the city of Los Angeles, photographed for ‘ National Geographic ’ in 2013. The Hollywood sign was not photoshopped in. (Photo: Steve Winter/Getty Images)

You might expect a child blessed with such a daily parade of fauna to live in a place we associate with wilderness. Montana, perhaps, or at least Marin County, California. But River lives with his parents, little sister, and dog just off Laurel Canyon Boulevard north of Sunset, a major artery for commuters in the heart of Los Angeles. River is a city kid.

The city of Chicago beats them all, assiduously tending acres of dunes, forests, and wetlands for resident skunks, coyotes, shorebirds, and raptors, making the city and its environs a bountiful refuge from the corn and soybean monoculture that surrounds it.

“Cities,” said Travis Longcore, a professor of spatial sciences at the University of Southern California and the science director of The Urban Wildlands Group in Los Angeles, “are enormous collectors of resources [for wildlife]. We bring water into them, we plant plants, we take care of those plants. We have food, we have trash, we have shelter.” Such abundance can set up a good life for predators and their prey, animals that elsewhere would spend their short lives hunting or running for cover on the edge of existence.

But it’s not just that wild animals have moved into our neighborhoods; humans have moved into theirs. We have in the last few decades made the wild more urban, pushing deeper into the country and higher into the mountains, and building on ever-steeper slopes. A 2013 report by the research firm CoreLogic found that of the 17 million homes built in the U.S. between 1990 and 2008, ten million were built in the “wildland-urban interface,” or WUI, where the city collides with the outback. If a bear strolls down from the mountains to swim in a suburban swimming pool, it may be because the pool covered her old familiar watering hole.

Simultaneously awed and terrified by our urban critters, we are at a loss to understand them. We leave food out for cats, but coyotes eat it; habituated to humans, they become a danger and have to be killed. We lure rats into boxes to gorge on blood-thinning poisons, not considering that the rats spread the poison up the food chain. We chop down rotting trees in the name of neighborhood beautification, destroying the homes of woodpeckers and egrets. We build freeways across canyons and lock animals into isolated parks to ensure their genetic decline. And as River Simard discovered, we build houses on mountainsides that disrupt movement critical to their hunting, hiding, and sheltering.

© 2018 AccuWeather, Inc. All Rights Reserved. AccuWeather.com is a registered trademark of AccuWeather, Inc. Terms of usage under which this service is provided Privacy Statement | Ad Choices

© 2018 AccuWeather, Inc. All Rights Reserved. AccuWeather.com is a registered trademark of AccuWeather, Inc. Terms of usage under which this service is provided Privacy Statement | Ad Choices

P-22, a mountain lion resident of the city of Los Angeles, photographed for ‘ National Geographic ’ in 2013. The Hollywood sign was not photoshopped in. (Photo: Steve Winter/Getty Images)

You might expect a child blessed with such a daily parade of fauna to live in a place we associate with wilderness. Montana, perhaps, or at least Marin County, California. But River lives with his parents, little sister, and dog just off Laurel Canyon Boulevard north of Sunset, a major artery for commuters in the heart of Los Angeles. River is a city kid.

The city of Chicago beats them all, assiduously tending acres of dunes, forests, and wetlands for resident skunks, coyotes, shorebirds, and raptors, making the city and its environs a bountiful refuge from the corn and soybean monoculture that surrounds it.

“Cities,” said Travis Longcore, a professor of spatial sciences at the University of Southern California and the science director of The Urban Wildlands Group in Los Angeles, “are enormous collectors of resources [for wildlife]. We bring water into them, we plant plants, we take care of those plants. We have food, we have trash, we have shelter.” Such abundance can set up a good life for predators and their prey, animals that elsewhere would spend their short lives hunting or running for cover on the edge of existence.

But it’s not just that wild animals have moved into our neighborhoods; humans have moved into theirs. We have in the last few decades made the wild more urban, pushing deeper into the country and higher into the mountains, and building on ever-steeper slopes. A 2013 report by the research firm CoreLogic found that of the 17 million homes built in the U.S. between 1990 and 2008, ten million were built in the “wildland-urban interface,” or WUI, where the city collides with the outback. If a bear strolls down from the mountains to swim in a suburban swimming pool, it may be because the pool covered her old familiar watering hole.

Simultaneously awed and terrified by our urban critters, we are at a loss to understand them. We leave food out for cats, but coyotes eat it; habituated to humans, they become a danger and have to be killed. We lure rats into boxes to gorge on blood-thinning poisons, not considering that the rats spread the poison up the food chain. We chop down rotting trees in the name of neighborhood beautification, destroying the homes of woodpeckers and egrets. We build freeways across canyons and lock animals into isolated parks to ensure their genetic decline. And as River Simard discovered, we build houses on mountainsides that disrupt movement critical to their hunting, hiding, and sheltering.

As a result of ALDF’s creative, groundbreaking lawsuit, both backyard slaughter operations have shuttered their doors. ALDF obtained a judgment against one operation, declaring the illicit slaughter house a public nuisance and enjoining the owners from ever operating a slaughter operation again. The owners of the second slaughterhouse elected to close their doors voluntarily, rather than risk a similar court judgment.

As Florida law allows its citizens to bring forth “public nuisance” lawsuits, ALDF is representing residents of Hillsborough County in the lawsuit who are alarmed by criminal violations of public health codes and animal slaughter and disposal laws, illegal sale of horse, cow, and pig meat, and horrifying cruelty to animals found in these yards. ALDF’s landmark case marks the first time Florida residents have sued to stop the unspeakable acts of cruelty committed by backyard butchers and the threat to public health, safety, and quality of life they pose.

ALDF’s lawsuit targets “backyard butchers” on farms where horses, cattle, pigs, goats, sheep, and birds are slaughtered, butchered, and sold for public consumption without any governmental oversight. On both farms, animals are routinely dragged, bludgeoned, stabbed, and butchered while still alive. Florida’s humane slaughter laws and cruelty codes prohibit such malicious acts of animal abuse. Although hobbyists and illegal entrepreneurs alike seek to profit from illegally confining, breeding, and slaughtering animals, as ALDF’s investigation shows, the horror animals endure at makeshift farms is unconscionable.

Children are often present at both the slaughter and the butchering of animals. As shown in the video, the defendants gut a pig and drag him with a meat hook while still alive and struggling. Another segment shows a defendant and an unidentified young girl torturing a goat by butchering him alive. They stab him, make holes in each of his hind legs with a knife to hang him from meat hooks, slice the nerves in his neck, and beat him with a meat cleaver. Death takes three to four minutes.

In a Florida subdivision called Citrus Park, many residents participate in backyard slaughter. Richard Couto, the undercover investigator from ARM, describes the confinement of animals on these types of farms as “basically torture chambers.” As documented by ARM’s investigation, illegally slaughtered horsemeat is sold on the black market. Slaughter pigs are fed discarded horse carcasses to hide the evidence of criminal activity and animal abuse. ALDF is stepping in to ensure these acts of cruelty come to an end, the offenders are punished, the health of citizens protected, and the tortured, abused, and butchered animals receive justice.

These “backyard butchers” are truly a danger to society. Two of the defendants have criminal records that demonstrate total disregard for the law. On farms like this, animals are tortured, whipped, confined in small spaces amongst reeking piles of garbage, shot and gutted while alive, starved, and then sold to the public in the black market. This is the price animals pay when backyard slaughter is allowed to proliferate.



91TD6B6skPL