Floral emblem - Wikipedia

Front Matter | The National Plant Genome Initiative.



The National Plant Collection by John Kelly (1994-09-03)

The security of U.S. agriculture is dependent on continual access to robust, high-quality crop varieties for a wide range of farming systems. Such varieties are made possible through investments in plant breeding. Plant breeding efforts provide new opportunities to develop additional markets, increase crop yields, reduce disease pressures, and adjust to changing growing environments.  The first comprehensive accounting of national plant breeding research investment was the 1994 National Plant Breeding Study by Iowa State University.

Between 1994 and 2001, there were rapid changes in the technology and structure of U.S. plant breeding. These changes impacted plant breeding research investment. In an effort to compare and update the information in the 1994 study, a follow-up study was done to describe U.S. plant breeding investment in 2001. The study covered all public and private organizations in the United States conducting plant breeding or variety development in 2001. The study was conducted from 2002 to 2004 by Auburn University and was funded by NIFA and the Economic Research Service.

For ease of comparison , tables and table numbers in the 2005 report of the 2001 data correspond to tables in the 1994 study. The 2001 and 1994 data are public domain and may be used for research, as long as the source is cited.

Greg Traxler, Albert K. A. Acquaye, Kenneth Frey, and Ann Marie Thro. Nov. 2005. Public Sector Plant Breeding Resources in the US: Study Results for the year 2001.

For additional information or for Microsoft Excel files of the 2001 data, contact Greg Traxler , Senior Program Officer, Agricultural Development Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Office: (206) 770-1684  Cell: (334) 524-1233

The security of U.S. agriculture is dependent on continual access to robust, high-quality crop varieties for a wide range of farming systems. Such varieties are made possible through investments in plant breeding. Plant breeding efforts provide new opportunities to develop additional markets, increase crop yields, reduce disease pressures, and adjust to changing growing environments.  The first comprehensive accounting of national plant breeding research investment was the 1994 National Plant Breeding Study by Iowa State University.

Between 1994 and 2001, there were rapid changes in the technology and structure of U.S. plant breeding. These changes impacted plant breeding research investment. In an effort to compare and update the information in the 1994 study, a follow-up study was done to describe U.S. plant breeding investment in 2001. The study covered all public and private organizations in the United States conducting plant breeding or variety development in 2001. The study was conducted from 2002 to 2004 by Auburn University and was funded by NIFA and the Economic Research Service.

For ease of comparison , tables and table numbers in the 2005 report of the 2001 data correspond to tables in the 1994 study. The 2001 and 1994 data are public domain and may be used for research, as long as the source is cited.

Greg Traxler, Albert K. A. Acquaye, Kenneth Frey, and Ann Marie Thro. Nov. 2005. Public Sector Plant Breeding Resources in the US: Study Results for the year 2001.

For additional information or for Microsoft Excel files of the 2001 data, contact Greg Traxler , Senior Program Officer, Agricultural Development Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Office: (206) 770-1684  Cell: (334) 524-1233

The National Plant Phenomics Centre (NPPC), hosted within the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) at Aberystwyth University is a National Capability funded by the BBSRC for use …

In a number of countries, plants have been chosen as symbols to represent specific geographic areas. Some countries have a country-wide floral emblem ; others in addition have symbols representing subdivisions. Different processes have been used to adopt these symbols – some are conferred by government bodies, whereas others are the result of informal public polls. The term floral emblem, which refers to flowers specifically, is primarily used in Australia and Canada. In the United States, the term state flower is more often used.

The national flower and floral emblem of Bangladesh is the shapla ( Bengali : শাপলা ), or Nymphaea nouchali ) [3] [4] See also: National Emblem of Bangladesh .

Cambodia formally adopted the romduol ( Khmer : រំដួល ) as its national flower in the year 2005 by a royal decree. [6] The royal decree designates the taxon as Mitrella mesnyi , however this is a taxonomically illegitimate synonym for Sphaerocoryne affinis Ridley . [7]

All three were chosen on World Environment Day in 1990. [8] and enforced by law through Presidential Decree ( Keputusan Presiden ) No. 4 1993, [9] On the other occasion Bunga Bangkai ( Titan arum ) was also added as puspa langka together with Rafflesia .

The Israeli national flower is the poppy anemone ( Anemone coronaria ; calanit metzuya in Hebrew ), chosen in 2013 to replace Cyclamen persicum . [10] [11]

The national flower of Malaysia is the bunga raya (Chinese Hibiscus, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ). [5] [12]

The security of U.S. agriculture is dependent on continual access to robust, high-quality crop varieties for a wide range of farming systems. Such varieties are made possible through investments in plant breeding. Plant breeding efforts provide new opportunities to develop additional markets, increase crop yields, reduce disease pressures, and adjust to changing growing environments.  The first comprehensive accounting of national plant breeding research investment was the 1994 National Plant Breeding Study by Iowa State University.

Between 1994 and 2001, there were rapid changes in the technology and structure of U.S. plant breeding. These changes impacted plant breeding research investment. In an effort to compare and update the information in the 1994 study, a follow-up study was done to describe U.S. plant breeding investment in 2001. The study covered all public and private organizations in the United States conducting plant breeding or variety development in 2001. The study was conducted from 2002 to 2004 by Auburn University and was funded by NIFA and the Economic Research Service.

For ease of comparison , tables and table numbers in the 2005 report of the 2001 data correspond to tables in the 1994 study. The 2001 and 1994 data are public domain and may be used for research, as long as the source is cited.

Greg Traxler, Albert K. A. Acquaye, Kenneth Frey, and Ann Marie Thro. Nov. 2005. Public Sector Plant Breeding Resources in the US: Study Results for the year 2001.

For additional information or for Microsoft Excel files of the 2001 data, contact Greg Traxler , Senior Program Officer, Agricultural Development Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Office: (206) 770-1684  Cell: (334) 524-1233

The National Plant Phenomics Centre (NPPC), hosted within the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) at Aberystwyth University is a National Capability funded by the BBSRC for use …



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