Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows Vol 2 | Marvel.

Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows Jumps Eight. - cbr.com



Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows Vol. 1: Brawl In The Family (Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows (2016-))

Renew Your Vows acts as a follow-up to last year's Secret Wars tie-in, though with the defeat of regent and the destruction of Battleworld, the general status quo is much more traditional Spider-Man. Here, Peter Parker is back to being a struggling photographer hocking photos to a perpetually grumpy J. Jonah Jameson. He's married to Mary Jane Watson, herself a small business owner. The big wrinkle, or course, is that Peter and MJ are parents to a precocious daughter with spider-powers of her own. Basically, this is the Spider-Man comic we might have gotten 15 or 20 years ago if the Clone Saga didn't pollute everything it touched.

Meanwhile, it's great seeing Stegman on a Spider-Man comic again after the great work he delivered on Scarlet Spider and Superior Spider-Man. Stegman was pretty much born to draw Spider-Man in general and a '90s-influenced Spidey book in particular. He taps into that powerful, stylized vibe without resorting to the more ridiculous anatomical excesses of the period. His heavy, detailed line-work brings a wonderful sense of texture to the page, but never to the point where it gives the book an overly dark tone or impedes the dialogue-driven scenes. Sonia Oback's bright, pleasant colors are a big help in that regard.

The main story is strong enough to justify the $4.99 cover price on its own, so the backup stories are really just icing on the cake. Writer/artist Anthony Holden delivers a ridiculously charming look at Peter and Annie May's relationship in his story. The MJ/Annie May story from Kate Leth and Marguerite Bennett is also entertaining, though like the main story, it doesn't do much to suggest that MJ is better off as a superhero than simply a struggling businesswoman and mother.

If the current incarnation of Amazing Spider-Man isn't floating your boat, maybe Renew Your Vows can do the trick. This new series boasts a terrific creative team exploring a more classically oriented Spider-Man status quo. Luckily, the series doesn't just coast by on nostalgia, as the fact that Peter is now a loving husband and father adds crucial new layers to his story.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Jumping to eight years after the end of issue #12, AMAZING SPIDER-MAN : RENEW YOUR VOWS #13 features teenage angst, clunky parenting, and the classic charm you can always expect from a Spider-Man book. The series definitely benefits from this time shift, as it reinvigorates the series with new potential. The new creative team of author  Jody Houser and artists  Nick Roche and  Ruth Redmond mix up the formula, with the fighting taking a back seat to the Parker family drama.

This issue is certainly not without its fair share of action. In fact, it opens and ends with very lively and colorful sequences. In the beginning, eight-years-older Annie takes center stage against the Sinister Six (in actually just a training exercise set up by Logan in the X-Men’s Danger Room). At the end, the Spider-Family unites against a rampaging Lizard on Coney Island. These segments work well to contain the family drama of the issue, which acts as the primary focus. This series has always had a good handle on balancing the two. So the lessened amount of action here should feel welcome to familiar readers.

Speaking of Annie, she shines in this issue. Her new costume is a beautiful sight. Her original outfit was cute, but once I heard about this new one I couldn’t wait to see it in action. It definitely looks great on the pages as well. Though there are some odd spots, Nick Roche and Ruth Redmond do a tremendous job bringing Annie, as well the rest of the cast, to life. Although it’s no secret that Logan is a short guy, Roche draws him much shorter than we usually see, which only adds to the humor of the issue. Given the large handful of artists who’ve worked on Spider-Man, Roche’s style is very befitting of the web-slinger and his world.

In a similar manner, Jody Houser is very welcome as the new writer of the series. She understands how these characters work, and knows how to get across both the angst of being a young teenager and the uncertainties of being a parent. Overall, her portrayal of the cast is spot on. As Annie is fighting the Sinister Six, she’s going on and on about getting a new superhero name. In the moment, it seems so unimportant, but you can’t help agreeing with her. This is just the sort of “personal, yet universal” kind of dialogue that’s part of a Spider-Man book.

The moment Spidey shows up, the humorous drama kicks in. Though family drama and overprotective parenting habits have been present throughout the series, it’s never been overbearing. So, in this issue, it feels more mature. For the first twelve installments, most of the drama came from Peter and MJ being extremely overprotective parents. They’re still kind of like that, but now the focus is more on them feeling awkward and unsure of how to act around their teenage daughter. The doubt shared between them feels very real, and I’m sure many parents can relate to it.

One of the best moments of the issue works with this drama in mind. Shortly after the training session with Logan, two pages are dedicated to Annie and her father talking during the car ride home. It’s impossible not to feel some secondhand awkwardness from Peter. He genuinely has no idea how to behave around his daughter, and it takes him a few panels to get the proper groove going. His behavior and dialogue seem very natural, as he’s struggling to relate and converse with his kid. His thoughts and actions, again, are probably relatable to many parents.

The Parker family is web-slinging and wall-crawling their way into your hearts and into comic shops later this year! Life is good for Peter Parker and Mary Jane; their daughter Annie is their pride and joy, they’re both working and (barely) making ends meet, they’re keeping the streets of New York City safe from super villains…you know, normal family stuff. Oh, did we mention MJ and Annie have Spider-Powers –– just like Peter?! Being Spider-Man just became a family affair…

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 001 (2017) (Digital) (F) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

The Mole Man attacks NYC and only the Spider-Family can stop him! Mary Jane Watson Parker gets her first real test as a full-fledged super hero!

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 002 (2017) (Digital) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

The Mole Man has attacked New York, and Spider-Man and MJ are down for the count! There’s only one person who can save them… their daughter!! On a school night?!

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 003 (2017) (Digital) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

AUSTRALIA'S AWARD WINNING COMIC BOOK SPECIALITY STORE - Shop Now close

Renew Your Vows acts as a follow-up to last year's Secret Wars tie-in, though with the defeat of regent and the destruction of Battleworld, the general status quo is much more traditional Spider-Man. Here, Peter Parker is back to being a struggling photographer hocking photos to a perpetually grumpy J. Jonah Jameson. He's married to Mary Jane Watson, herself a small business owner. The big wrinkle, or course, is that Peter and MJ are parents to a precocious daughter with spider-powers of her own. Basically, this is the Spider-Man comic we might have gotten 15 or 20 years ago if the Clone Saga didn't pollute everything it touched.

Meanwhile, it's great seeing Stegman on a Spider-Man comic again after the great work he delivered on Scarlet Spider and Superior Spider-Man. Stegman was pretty much born to draw Spider-Man in general and a '90s-influenced Spidey book in particular. He taps into that powerful, stylized vibe without resorting to the more ridiculous anatomical excesses of the period. His heavy, detailed line-work brings a wonderful sense of texture to the page, but never to the point where it gives the book an overly dark tone or impedes the dialogue-driven scenes. Sonia Oback's bright, pleasant colors are a big help in that regard.

The main story is strong enough to justify the $4.99 cover price on its own, so the backup stories are really just icing on the cake. Writer/artist Anthony Holden delivers a ridiculously charming look at Peter and Annie May's relationship in his story. The MJ/Annie May story from Kate Leth and Marguerite Bennett is also entertaining, though like the main story, it doesn't do much to suggest that MJ is better off as a superhero than simply a struggling businesswoman and mother.

If the current incarnation of Amazing Spider-Man isn't floating your boat, maybe Renew Your Vows can do the trick. This new series boasts a terrific creative team exploring a more classically oriented Spider-Man status quo. Luckily, the series doesn't just coast by on nostalgia, as the fact that Peter is now a loving husband and father adds crucial new layers to his story.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Jumping to eight years after the end of issue #12, AMAZING SPIDER-MAN : RENEW YOUR VOWS #13 features teenage angst, clunky parenting, and the classic charm you can always expect from a Spider-Man book. The series definitely benefits from this time shift, as it reinvigorates the series with new potential. The new creative team of author  Jody Houser and artists  Nick Roche and  Ruth Redmond mix up the formula, with the fighting taking a back seat to the Parker family drama.

This issue is certainly not without its fair share of action. In fact, it opens and ends with very lively and colorful sequences. In the beginning, eight-years-older Annie takes center stage against the Sinister Six (in actually just a training exercise set up by Logan in the X-Men’s Danger Room). At the end, the Spider-Family unites against a rampaging Lizard on Coney Island. These segments work well to contain the family drama of the issue, which acts as the primary focus. This series has always had a good handle on balancing the two. So the lessened amount of action here should feel welcome to familiar readers.

Speaking of Annie, she shines in this issue. Her new costume is a beautiful sight. Her original outfit was cute, but once I heard about this new one I couldn’t wait to see it in action. It definitely looks great on the pages as well. Though there are some odd spots, Nick Roche and Ruth Redmond do a tremendous job bringing Annie, as well the rest of the cast, to life. Although it’s no secret that Logan is a short guy, Roche draws him much shorter than we usually see, which only adds to the humor of the issue. Given the large handful of artists who’ve worked on Spider-Man, Roche’s style is very befitting of the web-slinger and his world.

In a similar manner, Jody Houser is very welcome as the new writer of the series. She understands how these characters work, and knows how to get across both the angst of being a young teenager and the uncertainties of being a parent. Overall, her portrayal of the cast is spot on. As Annie is fighting the Sinister Six, she’s going on and on about getting a new superhero name. In the moment, it seems so unimportant, but you can’t help agreeing with her. This is just the sort of “personal, yet universal” kind of dialogue that’s part of a Spider-Man book.

The moment Spidey shows up, the humorous drama kicks in. Though family drama and overprotective parenting habits have been present throughout the series, it’s never been overbearing. So, in this issue, it feels more mature. For the first twelve installments, most of the drama came from Peter and MJ being extremely overprotective parents. They’re still kind of like that, but now the focus is more on them feeling awkward and unsure of how to act around their teenage daughter. The doubt shared between them feels very real, and I’m sure many parents can relate to it.

One of the best moments of the issue works with this drama in mind. Shortly after the training session with Logan, two pages are dedicated to Annie and her father talking during the car ride home. It’s impossible not to feel some secondhand awkwardness from Peter. He genuinely has no idea how to behave around his daughter, and it takes him a few panels to get the proper groove going. His behavior and dialogue seem very natural, as he’s struggling to relate and converse with his kid. His thoughts and actions, again, are probably relatable to many parents.

The Parker family is web-slinging and wall-crawling their way into your hearts and into comic shops later this year! Life is good for Peter Parker and Mary Jane; their daughter Annie is their pride and joy, they’re both working and (barely) making ends meet, they’re keeping the streets of New York City safe from super villains…you know, normal family stuff. Oh, did we mention MJ and Annie have Spider-Powers –– just like Peter?! Being Spider-Man just became a family affair…

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 001 (2017) (Digital) (F) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

The Mole Man attacks NYC and only the Spider-Family can stop him! Mary Jane Watson Parker gets her first real test as a full-fledged super hero!

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 002 (2017) (Digital) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

The Mole Man has attacked New York, and Spider-Man and MJ are down for the count! There’s only one person who can save them… their daughter!! On a school night?!

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 003 (2017) (Digital) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

AUSTRALIA'S AWARD WINNING COMIC BOOK SPECIALITY STORE - Shop Now close

18.01.2018  · Back to title selection: Comics A: Amazing Spider- Man: Renew Your Vows Vol 2 Back to title...

09.11.2016  · Whatever your opinion on Peter Parker's status quo, Amazing Spider-Man writer Dan Slott deserves plenty of credit for pushing the hero in a dramatically ...

Jody Houser discusses her plans for Amazing Spider- Man: Renew Your Vows, which follows the adventures of Spidey, Mary Jane and their teenage daughter Annie.'

It's the annual Parker Family Fun Day on Coney Island! Marvel Comics' Amazing Spider- Man: Renew Your Vows #14 by Jody Houser & Nick Roche.'

Marvel.com is the source for Marvel comics, digital comics, comic strips, and more featuring Iron Man, Spider-Man, Hulk, X-Men and all your favorite superheroes.

AMAZING SPIDER- MAN: RENEW YOUR VOWS #13 makes a successful eight-year jump, bringing new possibilities for the Spider-Family.

Renew Your Vows acts as a follow-up to last year's Secret Wars tie-in, though with the defeat of regent and the destruction of Battleworld, the general status quo is much more traditional Spider-Man. Here, Peter Parker is back to being a struggling photographer hocking photos to a perpetually grumpy J. Jonah Jameson. He's married to Mary Jane Watson, herself a small business owner. The big wrinkle, or course, is that Peter and MJ are parents to a precocious daughter with spider-powers of her own. Basically, this is the Spider-Man comic we might have gotten 15 or 20 years ago if the Clone Saga didn't pollute everything it touched.

Meanwhile, it's great seeing Stegman on a Spider-Man comic again after the great work he delivered on Scarlet Spider and Superior Spider-Man. Stegman was pretty much born to draw Spider-Man in general and a '90s-influenced Spidey book in particular. He taps into that powerful, stylized vibe without resorting to the more ridiculous anatomical excesses of the period. His heavy, detailed line-work brings a wonderful sense of texture to the page, but never to the point where it gives the book an overly dark tone or impedes the dialogue-driven scenes. Sonia Oback's bright, pleasant colors are a big help in that regard.

The main story is strong enough to justify the $4.99 cover price on its own, so the backup stories are really just icing on the cake. Writer/artist Anthony Holden delivers a ridiculously charming look at Peter and Annie May's relationship in his story. The MJ/Annie May story from Kate Leth and Marguerite Bennett is also entertaining, though like the main story, it doesn't do much to suggest that MJ is better off as a superhero than simply a struggling businesswoman and mother.

If the current incarnation of Amazing Spider-Man isn't floating your boat, maybe Renew Your Vows can do the trick. This new series boasts a terrific creative team exploring a more classically oriented Spider-Man status quo. Luckily, the series doesn't just coast by on nostalgia, as the fact that Peter is now a loving husband and father adds crucial new layers to his story.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Renew Your Vows acts as a follow-up to last year's Secret Wars tie-in, though with the defeat of regent and the destruction of Battleworld, the general status quo is much more traditional Spider-Man. Here, Peter Parker is back to being a struggling photographer hocking photos to a perpetually grumpy J. Jonah Jameson. He's married to Mary Jane Watson, herself a small business owner. The big wrinkle, or course, is that Peter and MJ are parents to a precocious daughter with spider-powers of her own. Basically, this is the Spider-Man comic we might have gotten 15 or 20 years ago if the Clone Saga didn't pollute everything it touched.

Meanwhile, it's great seeing Stegman on a Spider-Man comic again after the great work he delivered on Scarlet Spider and Superior Spider-Man. Stegman was pretty much born to draw Spider-Man in general and a '90s-influenced Spidey book in particular. He taps into that powerful, stylized vibe without resorting to the more ridiculous anatomical excesses of the period. His heavy, detailed line-work brings a wonderful sense of texture to the page, but never to the point where it gives the book an overly dark tone or impedes the dialogue-driven scenes. Sonia Oback's bright, pleasant colors are a big help in that regard.

The main story is strong enough to justify the $4.99 cover price on its own, so the backup stories are really just icing on the cake. Writer/artist Anthony Holden delivers a ridiculously charming look at Peter and Annie May's relationship in his story. The MJ/Annie May story from Kate Leth and Marguerite Bennett is also entertaining, though like the main story, it doesn't do much to suggest that MJ is better off as a superhero than simply a struggling businesswoman and mother.

If the current incarnation of Amazing Spider-Man isn't floating your boat, maybe Renew Your Vows can do the trick. This new series boasts a terrific creative team exploring a more classically oriented Spider-Man status quo. Luckily, the series doesn't just coast by on nostalgia, as the fact that Peter is now a loving husband and father adds crucial new layers to his story.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Jumping to eight years after the end of issue #12, AMAZING SPIDER-MAN : RENEW YOUR VOWS #13 features teenage angst, clunky parenting, and the classic charm you can always expect from a Spider-Man book. The series definitely benefits from this time shift, as it reinvigorates the series with new potential. The new creative team of author  Jody Houser and artists  Nick Roche and  Ruth Redmond mix up the formula, with the fighting taking a back seat to the Parker family drama.

This issue is certainly not without its fair share of action. In fact, it opens and ends with very lively and colorful sequences. In the beginning, eight-years-older Annie takes center stage against the Sinister Six (in actually just a training exercise set up by Logan in the X-Men’s Danger Room). At the end, the Spider-Family unites against a rampaging Lizard on Coney Island. These segments work well to contain the family drama of the issue, which acts as the primary focus. This series has always had a good handle on balancing the two. So the lessened amount of action here should feel welcome to familiar readers.

Speaking of Annie, she shines in this issue. Her new costume is a beautiful sight. Her original outfit was cute, but once I heard about this new one I couldn’t wait to see it in action. It definitely looks great on the pages as well. Though there are some odd spots, Nick Roche and Ruth Redmond do a tremendous job bringing Annie, as well the rest of the cast, to life. Although it’s no secret that Logan is a short guy, Roche draws him much shorter than we usually see, which only adds to the humor of the issue. Given the large handful of artists who’ve worked on Spider-Man, Roche’s style is very befitting of the web-slinger and his world.

In a similar manner, Jody Houser is very welcome as the new writer of the series. She understands how these characters work, and knows how to get across both the angst of being a young teenager and the uncertainties of being a parent. Overall, her portrayal of the cast is spot on. As Annie is fighting the Sinister Six, she’s going on and on about getting a new superhero name. In the moment, it seems so unimportant, but you can’t help agreeing with her. This is just the sort of “personal, yet universal” kind of dialogue that’s part of a Spider-Man book.

The moment Spidey shows up, the humorous drama kicks in. Though family drama and overprotective parenting habits have been present throughout the series, it’s never been overbearing. So, in this issue, it feels more mature. For the first twelve installments, most of the drama came from Peter and MJ being extremely overprotective parents. They’re still kind of like that, but now the focus is more on them feeling awkward and unsure of how to act around their teenage daughter. The doubt shared between them feels very real, and I’m sure many parents can relate to it.

One of the best moments of the issue works with this drama in mind. Shortly after the training session with Logan, two pages are dedicated to Annie and her father talking during the car ride home. It’s impossible not to feel some secondhand awkwardness from Peter. He genuinely has no idea how to behave around his daughter, and it takes him a few panels to get the proper groove going. His behavior and dialogue seem very natural, as he’s struggling to relate and converse with his kid. His thoughts and actions, again, are probably relatable to many parents.

Renew Your Vows acts as a follow-up to last year's Secret Wars tie-in, though with the defeat of regent and the destruction of Battleworld, the general status quo is much more traditional Spider-Man. Here, Peter Parker is back to being a struggling photographer hocking photos to a perpetually grumpy J. Jonah Jameson. He's married to Mary Jane Watson, herself a small business owner. The big wrinkle, or course, is that Peter and MJ are parents to a precocious daughter with spider-powers of her own. Basically, this is the Spider-Man comic we might have gotten 15 or 20 years ago if the Clone Saga didn't pollute everything it touched.

Meanwhile, it's great seeing Stegman on a Spider-Man comic again after the great work he delivered on Scarlet Spider and Superior Spider-Man. Stegman was pretty much born to draw Spider-Man in general and a '90s-influenced Spidey book in particular. He taps into that powerful, stylized vibe without resorting to the more ridiculous anatomical excesses of the period. His heavy, detailed line-work brings a wonderful sense of texture to the page, but never to the point where it gives the book an overly dark tone or impedes the dialogue-driven scenes. Sonia Oback's bright, pleasant colors are a big help in that regard.

The main story is strong enough to justify the $4.99 cover price on its own, so the backup stories are really just icing on the cake. Writer/artist Anthony Holden delivers a ridiculously charming look at Peter and Annie May's relationship in his story. The MJ/Annie May story from Kate Leth and Marguerite Bennett is also entertaining, though like the main story, it doesn't do much to suggest that MJ is better off as a superhero than simply a struggling businesswoman and mother.

If the current incarnation of Amazing Spider-Man isn't floating your boat, maybe Renew Your Vows can do the trick. This new series boasts a terrific creative team exploring a more classically oriented Spider-Man status quo. Luckily, the series doesn't just coast by on nostalgia, as the fact that Peter is now a loving husband and father adds crucial new layers to his story.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Jumping to eight years after the end of issue #12, AMAZING SPIDER-MAN : RENEW YOUR VOWS #13 features teenage angst, clunky parenting, and the classic charm you can always expect from a Spider-Man book. The series definitely benefits from this time shift, as it reinvigorates the series with new potential. The new creative team of author  Jody Houser and artists  Nick Roche and  Ruth Redmond mix up the formula, with the fighting taking a back seat to the Parker family drama.

This issue is certainly not without its fair share of action. In fact, it opens and ends with very lively and colorful sequences. In the beginning, eight-years-older Annie takes center stage against the Sinister Six (in actually just a training exercise set up by Logan in the X-Men’s Danger Room). At the end, the Spider-Family unites against a rampaging Lizard on Coney Island. These segments work well to contain the family drama of the issue, which acts as the primary focus. This series has always had a good handle on balancing the two. So the lessened amount of action here should feel welcome to familiar readers.

Speaking of Annie, she shines in this issue. Her new costume is a beautiful sight. Her original outfit was cute, but once I heard about this new one I couldn’t wait to see it in action. It definitely looks great on the pages as well. Though there are some odd spots, Nick Roche and Ruth Redmond do a tremendous job bringing Annie, as well the rest of the cast, to life. Although it’s no secret that Logan is a short guy, Roche draws him much shorter than we usually see, which only adds to the humor of the issue. Given the large handful of artists who’ve worked on Spider-Man, Roche’s style is very befitting of the web-slinger and his world.

In a similar manner, Jody Houser is very welcome as the new writer of the series. She understands how these characters work, and knows how to get across both the angst of being a young teenager and the uncertainties of being a parent. Overall, her portrayal of the cast is spot on. As Annie is fighting the Sinister Six, she’s going on and on about getting a new superhero name. In the moment, it seems so unimportant, but you can’t help agreeing with her. This is just the sort of “personal, yet universal” kind of dialogue that’s part of a Spider-Man book.

The moment Spidey shows up, the humorous drama kicks in. Though family drama and overprotective parenting habits have been present throughout the series, it’s never been overbearing. So, in this issue, it feels more mature. For the first twelve installments, most of the drama came from Peter and MJ being extremely overprotective parents. They’re still kind of like that, but now the focus is more on them feeling awkward and unsure of how to act around their teenage daughter. The doubt shared between them feels very real, and I’m sure many parents can relate to it.

One of the best moments of the issue works with this drama in mind. Shortly after the training session with Logan, two pages are dedicated to Annie and her father talking during the car ride home. It’s impossible not to feel some secondhand awkwardness from Peter. He genuinely has no idea how to behave around his daughter, and it takes him a few panels to get the proper groove going. His behavior and dialogue seem very natural, as he’s struggling to relate and converse with his kid. His thoughts and actions, again, are probably relatable to many parents.

The Parker family is web-slinging and wall-crawling their way into your hearts and into comic shops later this year! Life is good for Peter Parker and Mary Jane; their daughter Annie is their pride and joy, they’re both working and (barely) making ends meet, they’re keeping the streets of New York City safe from super villains…you know, normal family stuff. Oh, did we mention MJ and Annie have Spider-Powers –– just like Peter?! Being Spider-Man just became a family affair…

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 001 (2017) (Digital) (F) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

The Mole Man attacks NYC and only the Spider-Family can stop him! Mary Jane Watson Parker gets her first real test as a full-fledged super hero!

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 002 (2017) (Digital) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud

The Mole Man has attacked New York, and Spider-Man and MJ are down for the count! There’s only one person who can save them… their daughter!! On a school night?!

Amazing Spider-Man – Renew Your Vows 003 (2017) (Digital) (Zone-Empire).cbr
Download from Filefactory
Download from Userscloud



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