The Fixed Period - Wikipedia

David Lodge: rereading Anthony Trollope | Books | The Guardian



The Fixed Period (Annotated)

Although Neverbend is humourless, for the reader there is humour, and also pathos, in the clash of his high-flown rhetoric with the instinctive reactions of others, including his own family. Neverbend is a zealot, but not an insensitive one. As the opposition to the Fixed Period grows, he actually begins "to ask myself whether I was in all respects sane in entertaining the ideas which filled my mind", but steadies his resolution by remembering the example of great men such as Galileo and Columbus, whose radical ideas were mocked and rejected in their own time.

It arrives in Britannula's harbour just as Neverbend is conducting the sullenly compliant Crasweller to take up residence in the College. The officer in charge of the landing-party intervenes and forbids the president to proceed, invoking the threat of the gunboat's "250-ton swiveller". Neverbend submits, vainly protesting against this exercise of brute force, and is informed that the island is to be made a Crown colony again, with a new governor to ensure that the law of the Fixed Period, unacceptable to the mother country, is repealed, while he himself must go into exile in England. The narrative we have been reading is in fact written on his voyage there.

Trollope's odd novel proved, in one respect, uncannily prophetic of his own demise. Neverbend recalls that when the Fixed Period law was being framed there was a long debate about the age at which it should be applied. Eventually this was fixed at 67½, though some flexibility was later allowed. At the beginning of November 1882, the year in which The Fixed Period was published, Trollope suffered a severe stroke, which paralysed his right side and deprived him of speech, but the fate he had feared was mercifully brief. He died in a nursing home on 6 December, five months short of his 68th birthday.

• This article was amended on 17 December 2012, to include the phrase "a situation that has been exacerbated by the global credit crisis" in the fifth sentence of the second paragraph.

Although Neverbend is humourless, for the reader there is humour, and also pathos, in the clash of his high-flown rhetoric with the instinctive reactions of others, including his own family. Neverbend is a zealot, but not an insensitive one. As the opposition to the Fixed Period grows, he actually begins "to ask myself whether I was in all respects sane in entertaining the ideas which filled my mind", but steadies his resolution by remembering the example of great men such as Galileo and Columbus, whose radical ideas were mocked and rejected in their own time.

It arrives in Britannula's harbour just as Neverbend is conducting the sullenly compliant Crasweller to take up residence in the College. The officer in charge of the landing-party intervenes and forbids the president to proceed, invoking the threat of the gunboat's "250-ton swiveller". Neverbend submits, vainly protesting against this exercise of brute force, and is informed that the island is to be made a Crown colony again, with a new governor to ensure that the law of the Fixed Period, unacceptable to the mother country, is repealed, while he himself must go into exile in England. The narrative we have been reading is in fact written on his voyage there.

Trollope's odd novel proved, in one respect, uncannily prophetic of his own demise. Neverbend recalls that when the Fixed Period law was being framed there was a long debate about the age at which it should be applied. Eventually this was fixed at 67½, though some flexibility was later allowed. At the beginning of November 1882, the year in which The Fixed Period was published, Trollope suffered a severe stroke, which paralysed his right side and deprived him of speech, but the fate he had feared was mercifully brief. He died in a nursing home on 6 December, five months short of his 68th birthday.

• This article was amended on 17 December 2012, to include the phrase "a situation that has been exacerbated by the global credit crisis" in the fifth sentence of the second paragraph.

FreeBookNotes found 3 sites with book summaries or analysis of The Fixed Period . If there is a The Fixed Period SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below.

Among the summaries and analysis available for The Fixed Period , there are 1 Short Summary and 2 Book Reviews. Depending on the study guide provider (SparkNotes, Shmoop, etc.), the resources below will generally offer The Fixed Period chapter summaries, quotes, and analysis of themes, characters, and symbols.

Browse books: Recent | popular | # | a | b | c | d | e | f | g | h | i | j | k | l | m | n | o | p | q | r | s | t | u | v | w | x | y | z |

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Fixed Period Annuity is a term used to describe a specific payout option for an Immediate Annuity contract. When an annuity distribution period begins or the annuitization begins, the annuitant can choose distributions over a fixed period of time. The amount of time is usually a function of many years such as ten or fifteen years during which annual, bi-annual, or monthly payments are made to the annuitant.

Fixed period annuities are usually chosen to cover a period of time during which no other benefits or income is earned. For example, a retiree may choose to purchase an annuity that would pay back over a period of time after regular income has ceased but retirement benefits or other benefits have not yet begun. If the annuitant dies before the annuity has finished paying out, the remaining annuity can be transferred to a beneficiary.

The Fixed Period Annuity can be structured with several different payout options. An annuity expert can work with you to determine which payout option is best for your unique situation.

The total sum of money distributed over the payment period is decided upon by the amount paid into an annuity, a shorter fixed period annuity would typically have larger payments to the annuitant than a longer fixed period annuity. Some annuities can also payout for the lifetime of the annuitant, otherwise known as Lifetime Annuities

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Although Neverbend is humourless, for the reader there is humour, and also pathos, in the clash of his high-flown rhetoric with the instinctive reactions of others, including his own family. Neverbend is a zealot, but not an insensitive one. As the opposition to the Fixed Period grows, he actually begins "to ask myself whether I was in all respects sane in entertaining the ideas which filled my mind", but steadies his resolution by remembering the example of great men such as Galileo and Columbus, whose radical ideas were mocked and rejected in their own time.

It arrives in Britannula's harbour just as Neverbend is conducting the sullenly compliant Crasweller to take up residence in the College. The officer in charge of the landing-party intervenes and forbids the president to proceed, invoking the threat of the gunboat's "250-ton swiveller". Neverbend submits, vainly protesting against this exercise of brute force, and is informed that the island is to be made a Crown colony again, with a new governor to ensure that the law of the Fixed Period, unacceptable to the mother country, is repealed, while he himself must go into exile in England. The narrative we have been reading is in fact written on his voyage there.

Trollope's odd novel proved, in one respect, uncannily prophetic of his own demise. Neverbend recalls that when the Fixed Period law was being framed there was a long debate about the age at which it should be applied. Eventually this was fixed at 67½, though some flexibility was later allowed. At the beginning of November 1882, the year in which The Fixed Period was published, Trollope suffered a severe stroke, which paralysed his right side and deprived him of speech, but the fate he had feared was mercifully brief. He died in a nursing home on 6 December, five months short of his 68th birthday.

• This article was amended on 17 December 2012, to include the phrase "a situation that has been exacerbated by the global credit crisis" in the fifth sentence of the second paragraph.

FreeBookNotes found 3 sites with book summaries or analysis of The Fixed Period . If there is a The Fixed Period SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below.

Among the summaries and analysis available for The Fixed Period , there are 1 Short Summary and 2 Book Reviews. Depending on the study guide provider (SparkNotes, Shmoop, etc.), the resources below will generally offer The Fixed Period chapter summaries, quotes, and analysis of themes, characters, and symbols.

Browse books: Recent | popular | # | a | b | c | d | e | f | g | h | i | j | k | l | m | n | o | p | q | r | s | t | u | v | w | x | y | z |



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