Aegri Somnia (2008) - IMDb

Aegri Somnia - Wikipedia



Aegri Somnia

Monde Obscure is an album of technical overkill. While listening, I’m reminded of an interview where industrial legends Front Line Assembly discussed the recording philosophy for their 1995 album Hard Wired . Bill Leeb and Rhys Fulber challenged themselves to leave no sonic space empty, cramming every byte of their hard drives with some sort of sample. At the time, it was a daunting yet cohesive experience, and a testament to FLA’s skill, but that was twenty years ago, and technology has since advanced a hundredfold.

The debut effort by Aegri Somnia (translated as “sick man’s dream”) follows a similar template, wherein every moment has multiple sounds and effects, fluttering and whirring and clanking and droning, both near and far. I can say one thing for Jurica Santek: he’s a master of sound design. There’s no debating that Monde Obscure is an incredible-sounding album. It’s dark ambient in HD, especially when experienced in FLAC via some capable headphones.

Aegri Somnia doesn’t use looped keyboard chords to ground the experience, and there’s little, if any, melodic content. There’s a nice bit of piano towards the end of “Les Temps Ont Change” which hints at the power contained here, but its impact is deadened against the walls of samples. The two-part “Sortie” and “Portal” tracks at the album’s close slow things down a bit – there’s some very nice atmospheric work happening at this point – but that’s the exception rather than the rule.

Monde Obscure is one of the most amazing tech demos I’ve ever heard. Santek is indeed a skilled audio producer. But there’s an aesthetic component to music as well, and it’s particularly important in a free-form genre such as dark ambient. Too much, or too little, and the experience is lessened. If Aegri Somnia can reduce the amount of static and provide some variation – or even better, a unifying undercurrent within each track and a clear identity for an album – the immersive interactivity that dark ambient is so adept at creating will be within reach. The tech aspect is down, now it’s time to focus on the art.

Monde Obscure is an album of technical overkill. While listening, I’m reminded of an interview where industrial legends Front Line Assembly discussed the recording philosophy for their 1995 album Hard Wired . Bill Leeb and Rhys Fulber challenged themselves to leave no sonic space empty, cramming every byte of their hard drives with some sort of sample. At the time, it was a daunting yet cohesive experience, and a testament to FLA’s skill, but that was twenty years ago, and technology has since advanced a hundredfold.

The debut effort by Aegri Somnia (translated as “sick man’s dream”) follows a similar template, wherein every moment has multiple sounds and effects, fluttering and whirring and clanking and droning, both near and far. I can say one thing for Jurica Santek: he’s a master of sound design. There’s no debating that Monde Obscure is an incredible-sounding album. It’s dark ambient in HD, especially when experienced in FLAC via some capable headphones.

Aegri Somnia doesn’t use looped keyboard chords to ground the experience, and there’s little, if any, melodic content. There’s a nice bit of piano towards the end of “Les Temps Ont Change” which hints at the power contained here, but its impact is deadened against the walls of samples. The two-part “Sortie” and “Portal” tracks at the album’s close slow things down a bit – there’s some very nice atmospheric work happening at this point – but that’s the exception rather than the rule.

Monde Obscure is one of the most amazing tech demos I’ve ever heard. Santek is indeed a skilled audio producer. But there’s an aesthetic component to music as well, and it’s particularly important in a free-form genre such as dark ambient. Too much, or too little, and the experience is lessened. If Aegri Somnia can reduce the amount of static and provide some variation – or even better, a unifying undercurrent within each track and a clear identity for an album – the immersive interactivity that dark ambient is so adept at creating will be within reach. The tech aspect is down, now it’s time to focus on the art.

Plot:
Even when Edgar was married he still kept himself isolated from the world but after his wife's suicide, the world seems to be closing in on Edgar. The shadows move on their own and the air is filled with the whispers of those around him and the creatures that haunt his nightmares. What is reality and what are dreams in the mind of Edgar?

I wasn't sure what I was going to be getting into with "Aegri Somnia": the trailer is vague but filled with nightmarish visuals; the plot synopsis is like a cryptic message. This was another title I was very happy to receive from the folks at R-Squared film because of how vague everything is revolving around the movie but there was just enough there to drive the desire to see it. So I was able to into the movie a blank canvas, no expectations. Supposedly 'aegri somnia' is a Latin phrase meaning "a sick man's dream" which couldn't be a more fitting phrase for this movie as it feels like a sick dream when watching it.

Positive things:
- Overall: top notch execution
- Fantastic cinematography.
- Amazing visuals.
- Fantastic sound design.
- Good performances.
- Great creature concepts.

Negative things:
- It takes a little while to get going.
- Tends to drag in certain spots in the middle.
- People giving more credit to David Lynch than James Rewucki. The movie is as good as it because of James' talent, not his supposed influences.



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