Desperate Times (Fate of Periand) (Volume 1): Ben Marshall.

Desperate Times (Fate of Periand Book 1) - amazon.com



Desperate Times (Fate of Periand) (Volume 1)

Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment Spoilers ahead for Star Trek: Discovery , Season 1, Episode 4.

No, not her untimely death. Everybody dies; it’s inevitable. Unfortunate and sad, for sure. But death is part of life, and there are precious few fictional stories where it doesn’t play some part. Aside from that, the producers of Star Trek: Discovery have stated that they’re treating the show like other big-budget, prestige format show, and one way in which we see it that way is that no character (aside from Michael Burnham, probably) is ever safe. Anyone can die at any time.

So it didn’t come as a terrible shock that she died, especially when Yeoh was listed in the opening credits as a “special guest star.” What did come as a shock was what happened after her death, which viewers only learned about in the fourth episode, “The Butcher’s Knife Cares Not for the Lamb’s Cry.”

Let’s rewind for a little context. The two-part series premiere ended , as you already know, with Captain Georgiou’s death at the hands of T’Kuvma. The would-be Klingon messiah stabbed her through the heart with his bat’leth — the traditional bladed weapon of a Klingon warrior. Despite her stated intention to capture T’Kuvma and use him as a bargaining chip in the war, Michael Burnham, Georgiou’s first officer, snapped when she saw her beloved captain die, and killed T’Kuvma in the heat of the moment.

Burnham desperately tried to bring Georgiou’s body back with her when she was transported back to the Shinzhou , but was unable to because the transporter couldn’t lock onto the captain’s life signs. Burnham was forced to leave the body behind and return to her ship alone, disgraced by her earlier attempted mutiny. But that’s another story.

In “The Butcher’s Knife…,” Discovery showed what became of T’Kuvma’s Sarcophagus Ship in the six months following the events that began the war. The ship was horribly damaged during the battle, and the rest of the Klingon Empire, for reasons unknown, simply left it there at the binary stars where the battle took place. Kol, T’Kuvma’s torchbearer and successor, tried to carry on in his place, raiding and looting other derelict ships left behind from the battle in order to repair their ship.

FictionDB is committed to providing the best possible fiction reference information. If you have any issues with the site, please don't hesitate to contact us. More about us.

On today's edition of "The View," Neal McDonough dropped a pretty major bomb regarding the fate of his "Desperate Housewives" character, resident psychopath Dave Williams.

You can stop reading now if you don't want to ruin the end for yourself, but if you've been watching this season, it should not come as that big of a shock .

McDonough let it slip to the "View" hosts that the revenge-bent Dave will die during the "Desperate Housewives" season finale May 17. 

When asked by Joy Behar if McDonough was originally supposed to die along with Edie, the actor answered:  "No, I’m the mystery for the entire year so I wasn’t supposed to die until the very last episode."

Even more interesting, the actor also seemed to confirm that a "Desperate Housewives" spin-off is in the works revolving around the show's Karen McCluskey (Kathryn Joosten) and her sister Roberta (Lily Tomlin, who will also be back for the finale).

The New York Post first wrote about the potential project on Tuesday, likening it to a modern-day "Golden Girls," a show that "Desperate Housewives" creator-executive producer Marc Cherry wrote for in the early '90s. The paper said it was unclear whether Cherry would be involved.

Resident Evil Outbreak File #2 ( Biohazard Outbreak File #2 in Japan) is an online game for the PlayStation 2 which was first released in September 2004 in Japan. It is a sequel and expansion on Resident Evil Outbreak , which was originally envisioned as a much larger game before being cut into multiple releases, containing levels which failed to be completed in time for the original game's release. The same eight characters from the first title return with similar abilities, and the game takes place once again in a zombie-run Raccoon City.

While the first title was a reasonable success worldwide, File #2 failed to satisfy the Japanese market even with its offer of a pre-order promotional demo of Devil May Cry 3 . [1] Consequently, it was decided that the remaining unfinished levels for the original game were to be shelved .

File #2 includes several improvements from the first Outbreak . Loading times are now much shorter, with the average DVD loading screen counting in at seven seconds. HDD loading is now about 1–3 seconds. There is no longer a brief "pause" when the inventory or map is opened (although there may be a pause whenever a character equips a weapon), players can now walk and shoot at the same time, a new item was given to each of the original characters, including magazines for their weapons (Kevin and Mark), a new defensive weapon (Alyssa), a team-aid item (George, Cindy), a lighter that has "J's Bar" engraved on it (David), and stat-boosting items (Jim, Yoko).

Communication is roughly the same, which has turned many players away from File #2 . Instead of creating a new system from scratch, the old communication system from the first game has been improved upon. These new additions included the ad-lib phrase "Sorry", and the ability to say comments based on what players were looking at on the Map and File screens.

The game also boasts a new difficulty feature and some changes to the game's balance. These include a new Nightmare Mode and several alternations to previous damage charts. For example, the zombie's grab attack did around 300 damage in the original Outbreak . It now does well over 600. These changes, combined with a new zombie speed and increased attack range, make the game a challenge to even veteran Resident Evil players.

In the American version of the game, the "ad-libs" from the first game have been removed. Now, only when a character uses the analog stick or makes a request do they make a noise. If context ad-libbing is attempted, no sounds are made, affecting gameplay. If a player attempts to tell someone they were poisoned, the chances of that player getting the message was low if he or she is in the middle of combat. The Japanese release, however, features full voices, with the European featuring only voices and no text.

Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment Spoilers ahead for Star Trek: Discovery , Season 1, Episode 4.

No, not her untimely death. Everybody dies; it’s inevitable. Unfortunate and sad, for sure. But death is part of life, and there are precious few fictional stories where it doesn’t play some part. Aside from that, the producers of Star Trek: Discovery have stated that they’re treating the show like other big-budget, prestige format show, and one way in which we see it that way is that no character (aside from Michael Burnham, probably) is ever safe. Anyone can die at any time.

So it didn’t come as a terrible shock that she died, especially when Yeoh was listed in the opening credits as a “special guest star.” What did come as a shock was what happened after her death, which viewers only learned about in the fourth episode, “The Butcher’s Knife Cares Not for the Lamb’s Cry.”

Let’s rewind for a little context. The two-part series premiere ended , as you already know, with Captain Georgiou’s death at the hands of T’Kuvma. The would-be Klingon messiah stabbed her through the heart with his bat’leth — the traditional bladed weapon of a Klingon warrior. Despite her stated intention to capture T’Kuvma and use him as a bargaining chip in the war, Michael Burnham, Georgiou’s first officer, snapped when she saw her beloved captain die, and killed T’Kuvma in the heat of the moment.

Burnham desperately tried to bring Georgiou’s body back with her when she was transported back to the Shinzhou , but was unable to because the transporter couldn’t lock onto the captain’s life signs. Burnham was forced to leave the body behind and return to her ship alone, disgraced by her earlier attempted mutiny. But that’s another story.

In “The Butcher’s Knife…,” Discovery showed what became of T’Kuvma’s Sarcophagus Ship in the six months following the events that began the war. The ship was horribly damaged during the battle, and the rest of the Klingon Empire, for reasons unknown, simply left it there at the binary stars where the battle took place. Kol, T’Kuvma’s torchbearer and successor, tried to carry on in his place, raiding and looting other derelict ships left behind from the battle in order to repair their ship.

FictionDB is committed to providing the best possible fiction reference information. If you have any issues with the site, please don't hesitate to contact us. More about us.

Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment Spoilers ahead for Star Trek: Discovery , Season 1, Episode 4.

No, not her untimely death. Everybody dies; it’s inevitable. Unfortunate and sad, for sure. But death is part of life, and there are precious few fictional stories where it doesn’t play some part. Aside from that, the producers of Star Trek: Discovery have stated that they’re treating the show like other big-budget, prestige format show, and one way in which we see it that way is that no character (aside from Michael Burnham, probably) is ever safe. Anyone can die at any time.

So it didn’t come as a terrible shock that she died, especially when Yeoh was listed in the opening credits as a “special guest star.” What did come as a shock was what happened after her death, which viewers only learned about in the fourth episode, “The Butcher’s Knife Cares Not for the Lamb’s Cry.”

Let’s rewind for a little context. The two-part series premiere ended , as you already know, with Captain Georgiou’s death at the hands of T’Kuvma. The would-be Klingon messiah stabbed her through the heart with his bat’leth — the traditional bladed weapon of a Klingon warrior. Despite her stated intention to capture T’Kuvma and use him as a bargaining chip in the war, Michael Burnham, Georgiou’s first officer, snapped when she saw her beloved captain die, and killed T’Kuvma in the heat of the moment.

Burnham desperately tried to bring Georgiou’s body back with her when she was transported back to the Shinzhou , but was unable to because the transporter couldn’t lock onto the captain’s life signs. Burnham was forced to leave the body behind and return to her ship alone, disgraced by her earlier attempted mutiny. But that’s another story.

In “The Butcher’s Knife…,” Discovery showed what became of T’Kuvma’s Sarcophagus Ship in the six months following the events that began the war. The ship was horribly damaged during the battle, and the rest of the Klingon Empire, for reasons unknown, simply left it there at the binary stars where the battle took place. Kol, T’Kuvma’s torchbearer and successor, tried to carry on in his place, raiding and looting other derelict ships left behind from the battle in order to repair their ship.

Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment Spoilers ahead for Star Trek: Discovery , Season 1, Episode 4.

No, not her untimely death. Everybody dies; it’s inevitable. Unfortunate and sad, for sure. But death is part of life, and there are precious few fictional stories where it doesn’t play some part. Aside from that, the producers of Star Trek: Discovery have stated that they’re treating the show like other big-budget, prestige format show, and one way in which we see it that way is that no character (aside from Michael Burnham, probably) is ever safe. Anyone can die at any time.

So it didn’t come as a terrible shock that she died, especially when Yeoh was listed in the opening credits as a “special guest star.” What did come as a shock was what happened after her death, which viewers only learned about in the fourth episode, “The Butcher’s Knife Cares Not for the Lamb’s Cry.”

Let’s rewind for a little context. The two-part series premiere ended , as you already know, with Captain Georgiou’s death at the hands of T’Kuvma. The would-be Klingon messiah stabbed her through the heart with his bat’leth — the traditional bladed weapon of a Klingon warrior. Despite her stated intention to capture T’Kuvma and use him as a bargaining chip in the war, Michael Burnham, Georgiou’s first officer, snapped when she saw her beloved captain die, and killed T’Kuvma in the heat of the moment.

Burnham desperately tried to bring Georgiou’s body back with her when she was transported back to the Shinzhou , but was unable to because the transporter couldn’t lock onto the captain’s life signs. Burnham was forced to leave the body behind and return to her ship alone, disgraced by her earlier attempted mutiny. But that’s another story.

In “The Butcher’s Knife…,” Discovery showed what became of T’Kuvma’s Sarcophagus Ship in the six months following the events that began the war. The ship was horribly damaged during the battle, and the rest of the Klingon Empire, for reasons unknown, simply left it there at the binary stars where the battle took place. Kol, T’Kuvma’s torchbearer and successor, tried to carry on in his place, raiding and looting other derelict ships left behind from the battle in order to repair their ship.

FictionDB is committed to providing the best possible fiction reference information. If you have any issues with the site, please don't hesitate to contact us. More about us.

On today's edition of "The View," Neal McDonough dropped a pretty major bomb regarding the fate of his "Desperate Housewives" character, resident psychopath Dave Williams.

You can stop reading now if you don't want to ruin the end for yourself, but if you've been watching this season, it should not come as that big of a shock .

McDonough let it slip to the "View" hosts that the revenge-bent Dave will die during the "Desperate Housewives" season finale May 17. 

When asked by Joy Behar if McDonough was originally supposed to die along with Edie, the actor answered:  "No, I’m the mystery for the entire year so I wasn’t supposed to die until the very last episode."

Even more interesting, the actor also seemed to confirm that a "Desperate Housewives" spin-off is in the works revolving around the show's Karen McCluskey (Kathryn Joosten) and her sister Roberta (Lily Tomlin, who will also be back for the finale).

The New York Post first wrote about the potential project on Tuesday, likening it to a modern-day "Golden Girls," a show that "Desperate Housewives" creator-executive producer Marc Cherry wrote for in the early '90s. The paper said it was unclear whether Cherry would be involved.

Resident Evil Outbreak File #2 ( Biohazard Outbreak File #2 in Japan) is an online game for the PlayStation 2 which was first released in September 2004 in Japan. It is a sequel and expansion on Resident Evil Outbreak , which was originally envisioned as a much larger game before being cut into multiple releases, containing levels which failed to be completed in time for the original game's release. The same eight characters from the first title return with similar abilities, and the game takes place once again in a zombie-run Raccoon City.

While the first title was a reasonable success worldwide, File #2 failed to satisfy the Japanese market even with its offer of a pre-order promotional demo of Devil May Cry 3 . [1] Consequently, it was decided that the remaining unfinished levels for the original game were to be shelved .

File #2 includes several improvements from the first Outbreak . Loading times are now much shorter, with the average DVD loading screen counting in at seven seconds. HDD loading is now about 1–3 seconds. There is no longer a brief "pause" when the inventory or map is opened (although there may be a pause whenever a character equips a weapon), players can now walk and shoot at the same time, a new item was given to each of the original characters, including magazines for their weapons (Kevin and Mark), a new defensive weapon (Alyssa), a team-aid item (George, Cindy), a lighter that has "J's Bar" engraved on it (David), and stat-boosting items (Jim, Yoko).

Communication is roughly the same, which has turned many players away from File #2 . Instead of creating a new system from scratch, the old communication system from the first game has been improved upon. These new additions included the ad-lib phrase "Sorry", and the ability to say comments based on what players were looking at on the Map and File screens.

The game also boasts a new difficulty feature and some changes to the game's balance. These include a new Nightmare Mode and several alternations to previous damage charts. For example, the zombie's grab attack did around 300 damage in the original Outbreak . It now does well over 600. These changes, combined with a new zombie speed and increased attack range, make the game a challenge to even veteran Resident Evil players.

In the American version of the game, the "ad-libs" from the first game have been removed. Now, only when a character uses the analog stick or makes a request do they make a noise. If context ad-libbing is attempted, no sounds are made, affecting gameplay. If a player attempts to tell someone they were poisoned, the chances of that player getting the message was low if he or she is in the middle of combat. The Japanese release, however, features full voices, with the European featuring only voices and no text.

2001 год: Космическая одиссея (1968)
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Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment Spoilers ahead for Star Trek: Discovery , Season 1, Episode 4.

No, not her untimely death. Everybody dies; it’s inevitable. Unfortunate and sad, for sure. But death is part of life, and there are precious few fictional stories where it doesn’t play some part. Aside from that, the producers of Star Trek: Discovery have stated that they’re treating the show like other big-budget, prestige format show, and one way in which we see it that way is that no character (aside from Michael Burnham, probably) is ever safe. Anyone can die at any time.

So it didn’t come as a terrible shock that she died, especially when Yeoh was listed in the opening credits as a “special guest star.” What did come as a shock was what happened after her death, which viewers only learned about in the fourth episode, “The Butcher’s Knife Cares Not for the Lamb’s Cry.”

Let’s rewind for a little context. The two-part series premiere ended , as you already know, with Captain Georgiou’s death at the hands of T’Kuvma. The would-be Klingon messiah stabbed her through the heart with his bat’leth — the traditional bladed weapon of a Klingon warrior. Despite her stated intention to capture T’Kuvma and use him as a bargaining chip in the war, Michael Burnham, Georgiou’s first officer, snapped when she saw her beloved captain die, and killed T’Kuvma in the heat of the moment.

Burnham desperately tried to bring Georgiou’s body back with her when she was transported back to the Shinzhou , but was unable to because the transporter couldn’t lock onto the captain’s life signs. Burnham was forced to leave the body behind and return to her ship alone, disgraced by her earlier attempted mutiny. But that’s another story.

In “The Butcher’s Knife…,” Discovery showed what became of T’Kuvma’s Sarcophagus Ship in the six months following the events that began the war. The ship was horribly damaged during the battle, and the rest of the Klingon Empire, for reasons unknown, simply left it there at the binary stars where the battle took place. Kol, T’Kuvma’s torchbearer and successor, tried to carry on in his place, raiding and looting other derelict ships left behind from the battle in order to repair their ship.

FictionDB is committed to providing the best possible fiction reference information. If you have any issues with the site, please don't hesitate to contact us. More about us.

On today's edition of "The View," Neal McDonough dropped a pretty major bomb regarding the fate of his "Desperate Housewives" character, resident psychopath Dave Williams.

You can stop reading now if you don't want to ruin the end for yourself, but if you've been watching this season, it should not come as that big of a shock .

McDonough let it slip to the "View" hosts that the revenge-bent Dave will die during the "Desperate Housewives" season finale May 17. 

When asked by Joy Behar if McDonough was originally supposed to die along with Edie, the actor answered:  "No, I’m the mystery for the entire year so I wasn’t supposed to die until the very last episode."

Even more interesting, the actor also seemed to confirm that a "Desperate Housewives" spin-off is in the works revolving around the show's Karen McCluskey (Kathryn Joosten) and her sister Roberta (Lily Tomlin, who will also be back for the finale).

The New York Post first wrote about the potential project on Tuesday, likening it to a modern-day "Golden Girls," a show that "Desperate Housewives" creator-executive producer Marc Cherry wrote for in the early '90s. The paper said it was unclear whether Cherry would be involved.



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